Go Back   Corvette Forum > Off Topic > Off Topic
Sign in using an external account
Register Forgot Password?
Register Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read FAQ Vendor Directory
Search
Off Topic
Off Topic | Non-Corvette Sponsored by
Bondurant School of HPD

Welcome to Corvetteforum.com!
Welcome to Corvetteforum.com.

You are currently viewing our forum as a guest, which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our community, at no cost, you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is free, fast and simple, join Corvetteforum.com today!


Corvette Store
 
 
C7 Parts & Accessories
C6 Parts & Accessories
C5 Parts & Accessories
C4 Parts & Accessories
C3 Parts & Accessories
C2 Parts & Accessories
C1 Parts & Accessories
Wheels & Tires
Sponsored Ads
 
 
Vendor Directory
  
Reply
 
 
 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 12-25-2009, 12:09 AM   #1
PUNISHER VETTE
CF Senior Member
 
PUNISHER VETTE's Avatar
 
Member Since: Dec 2005
Location: Ephrata Pennsylvania
Default Impact wrenches and air compressors, what's good?

So i'd like to build my tool collection up to include an impact gun. I'm tired of using a manual ratchet all the time plus the added power for large bolts. Making an impact wrench what i need?

What makes an impact wrench good?


Why do you need special sockets for them? What would happen if i use my craftsmen sockets with it? I just find it crappy that I have a nice socket set that i can't use now without buying new ones meant for impact wrenches?

I know you need an air compressor to run them but i hate the noise one brings to the garage. Do they make quiet ones? Or how are the electric impact wrenches?
PUNISHER VETTE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2009, 12:21 AM   #2
JustinD
CF Senior Member
 
JustinD's Avatar
 
Member Since: Jun 2005
Location: Inver Grove Minnesota
Default

To start off you will not get any power out of a electric impact. If you are going to be using it to work on rusty stuff and whatnot it will not get you anywhere. Compressors are loud, belt drive are going to be quieter than direct. Buy the highest CFM pump and largest tank you can afford. As for the impact a really good one is expensive. There are some 200 dollar ones that will work very well. Although if it is volume you want to keep down I used a matco impact of a buddies that was only 82 db. The socket beating the bolt was louder than the hammers in the gun.
JustinD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2009, 12:44 AM   #3
Jon Hekking
CF Senior Member
 
Jon Hekking's Avatar
 
Member Since: Jul 2007
Location: Salt Lake City Utah
Send a message via AIM to Jon Hekking
Default

As a MAC Tool District Manager, I spend my days in tool trucks and shops and I sell thousands of dollars in tools every day. Here's the skinny on impacts, if you want an air powered impact, go with one that is 1/2" and rated at a minimum of 600 ft lbs. You can opt for quiet technology if you want to keep the sound down, these are required in some states as well. Make sure to get a gun with a titanium body that will hold up better. If you find a MAC distributor ask for a AW612Q, great gun for a very reasonable price.

However, don't be afraid of the new electric impacts. Ours are 19.2 volt, lithium - ion powered and rated for 300 ft lbs of torque which will pull the lugs off of any wheel. Our number is CDH12192F. Many mechanics are starting to opt for these guns.

You need impact sockets because they are a hardened steel that can withstand the pounding that a impact puts on them. Standard chrome sockets will either crack or the socket will round off where it is installed on the impact. Impact sockets are warrantied for life whereas chrome sockets that show signs of being used on an impact wrench are not warrantied. That's true with all tool suppliers.

Hope it helps,

Jon
Jon Hekking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2009, 12:50 AM   #4
JustinD
CF Senior Member
 
JustinD's Avatar
 
Member Since: Jun 2005
Location: Inver Grove Minnesota
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon Hekking View Post
Impact sockets are warrantied for life whereas chrome sockets that show signs of being used on an impact wrench are not warrantied. That's true with all tool suppliers

Jon
I have used craftsman sockets with my impact before and cracked them right down the side.
JustinD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2009, 12:52 AM   #5
jack_squat
CF Senior Member
 
jack_squat's Avatar
 
Member Since: Jan 2007
Default

Good luck but look for made in USA. Everything is likely made in China now but Ingersoll-Rand, Snap-on or Chicago Pneumatic were the best when I bought mine 30 years ago. Even if made off-shore these brands are likely made in decent factories to their specs. Cheapos from Harbor Freight etc are much cheaper but are sloppy with coarse gearing and don't stand up to the test of time. If you buy good ones your grandchildren will be using them someday.
For 3/8 air ratchets you can get by with quality sockets, but for 1/2 drive impacts you should use impact sockets. Standard sockets are too brittle and could/will break and you risk potential serious injury. I'd hate to see someone lose an eye from a fractured socket.
Air guns and ratchets are definitely a worthwhile investment if you do alot of your own work. 3/8 air ratchets are not only faster, you can get in tight places where you don't have any room to swing a regular ratchet through it's arc.
jack_squat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2009, 01:38 AM   #6
Jon Hekking
CF Senior Member
 
Jon Hekking's Avatar
 
Member Since: Jul 2007
Location: Salt Lake City Utah
Send a message via AIM to Jon Hekking
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jack_squat View Post
Good luck but look for made in USA. Everything is likely made in China now but Ingersoll-Rand, Snap-on or Chicago Pneumatic were the best when I bought mine 30 years ago. Even if made off-shore these brands are likely made in decent factories to their specs. Cheapos from Harbor Freight etc are much cheaper but are sloppy with coarse gearing and don't stand up to the test of time. If you buy good ones your grandchildren will be using them someday.
For 3/8 air ratchets you can get by with quality sockets, but for 1/2 drive impacts you should use impact sockets. Standard sockets are too brittle and could/will break and you risk potential serious injury. I'd hate to see someone lose an eye from a fractured socket.
Air guns and ratchets are definitely a worthwhile investment if you do alot of your own work. 3/8 air ratchets are not only faster, you can get in tight places where you don't have any room to swing a regular ratchet through it's arc.
So true, look for American made sockets. Most of Craftsman are NOT American made anymore and Harbor Freight is junk. All MAC Tools sockets are made in our plants in Texas and all carry lifetime warranty. That's what you want to look for. Chrome sockets will and do hold up when used on a 3/8" air ratchet. If you get one consider one with a rotating head to help reach all angles.

Jon
Jon Hekking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2009, 01:48 AM   #7
psychodiagnostik
CF Senior Member
 
psychodiagnostik's Avatar
 
Member Since: Jan 2005
Default

I've got a cheap Campbell/Hausfield compressor, and a 1/2" impact gun. Honestly, I rarely use it even though I work on both our family's cars, especially my C4, a lot. The thing is, for automotive work on late-models, most stuff is hard to reach. Having an expanded set of ratchet handles, u-joints, "crow's feet", flex extensions, and combination wrenches is more important than an impact, IMHO. I really only use the impact when taking off the wheels quick. I've never had a stuck fastener I could get to with the impact. PB Blaster, a breaker bar, and the aforementioned joints and stuff have been my solution for stuck fasteners.
psychodiagnostik is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2009, 02:38 AM   #8
C41987
CF Senior Member
 
Member Since: Aug 2008
Location: Lebanon MO
Default

Get a commercial air compressor. Do Not get the oil-less ones. They will burn up with heavy use, ie.. impact or sanders. They are noisier, but will last a whole lot longer. The size will be determined by how much you intend to use it. A lot of sanding or impacting, I would recommend a 60 gal. I picked up one on clearance for under $400.
No offense to the Mac guy, but Sears tools (sockets and wrenches) are guaranteed for life, NO exceptions. I would definitely use their sockets and wrenches. Air tools are not included with this.
On impacts and ratchets, I think Snap-On or Mac are better than Sears. Buy the best you can afford.
C41987 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2009, 07:20 AM   #9
RAMMAN
CF Senior Member
 
RAMMAN's Avatar
 
Member Since: Aug 2006
Location: Driving Z16 #1599 in Denver CO
Default

Iíve been using Snap On air tools at work for the over 30 years, I have to get them rebuilt once in a while but they have served me well.

When it came time to outfit my home garage I just couldnít justify the cost of Snap On at home and went with Ingersoll Rand. So far Iím Very happy with them and a lot of the other technicians I work with use them professionally.

Get a good 2 stage air compressor with a 60 gallon tank like mine if you have room for it and 220 volt service in your garage. They are much quieter than those cheap oiless compressors, and with the large tank and two stage pump donít have to run very often.

Click the image to open in full size.
__________________

ASE Certified L1 Master Automobile/ L2 Master Heavy Truck/ Master Truck Equipment Technician
Alternative Fuels Vehicle Specialist
RAMMAN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2009, 08:05 AM   #10
juiceman03070
CF Senior Member
St. Jude Donor '08
Support Corvetteforum!
 
juiceman03070's Avatar
 
Member Since: Aug 2004
Location: Hamburger Hill...MAY 69
Default

Depends on how serious you are going to get ..
I have a piped in 80 gallon compressor with both Craftsman and Snap On air tools ..for the big stuff ..
I also have a Dewalt 18 volt impact gun for changing tires and small stuff .that saves filling the compressor ..
juiceman03070 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2009, 08:19 AM   #11
Radioshop
CF Senior Member
 
Member Since: Mar 2006
Default

When it came time to buy a compressor, I searched E-bay for an old commercial unit. I restricted the search to within 100 miles of home. I got a 5 hp two stage compressor on an 80 gallon tank for $200. It came with the a concrete pad, which I had to dispose of and I had to rent a forklift to get it out of my pick up truck. Mine is a low RPM unit so it's turns pretty slow. When it's running you hardly hear it. The IR I wanted was smaller and closer to $1k. All told the project was about $350 with compressor, forklift and, wiring. What a steal!

For impact guns, again, hit E-bay for used Mac or Snap-On. I'm a Snap-On guy myself. I buy off the truck at work, but at home I buy used, which is still better than Chinese Craftsman. Plus for a nominal fee the real tool companies will rebuild your gun. I paid $40 for my Snap-On impact gun and $80 for my air ratchet.

I have the 18v Snap-On battery impact gun. It'll twist the snot of out some hardware now. Oftentimes I'll use it rather than fire up the compressor. I put it under the back seat when I go on a road trip.
Radioshop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2009, 09:06 AM   #12
O'Shark
CF Senior Member
 
O'Shark's Avatar
 
Member Since: May 2000
Location: New Ross, Indiana population 334
Send a message via AIM to O'Shark
Default

I'll say right off the bat that I hate oil-less direct drive compressors. The noise is very bad in a small to moderately sized shop. With that said though, one of these is probably all you need. I have a 5HP, 20 gallon Coleman Powermate direct drive unit that has helped roof a 15 square house as well as removed hundreds of lugnuts and lawnmower blades. I bought it 12 years ago and it has spent its life in unheated buildings. It works perfectly and while you will have to take a break and let it recharge itself if you really tax it, it will get the job done. If you are going to paint cars or do a lot of grinding, look for a 2 stage belt driven model. As for impact guns, I use an Ingersoll twin hammer gun that will break loose anything that I have need to work on at home. The downside is that it sounds like a top fuel dragster. Invest in a set of impact sockets for sure. Craftsman makes a good impact socket set.

In my professional life, I use Sioux impact guns for fasteners up to 25mm or so. I use only Snap-On impact sockets in both straight wall and universal styles. A few of the most basic swivel impact sockets should live in every gearhead's toolbox. For removing fasteners that have been torqued to 900nm or so, I use a Sioux Plarad 2-speed gear reduction gun. That thing is amazing. I can apply 800nm to a fastener with one hand . My company buys compressed air by the truckload. As for durability, I've had good reliability out of both the Sioux and Chicago Pneumatic impact guns.
O'Shark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2009, 09:25 AM   #13
mrvette
CF Senior Member
 
mrvette's Avatar
 
Member Since: Jul 1999
Location: Orange Park Florida
Default

Local hock shop for all my stuff, Snap 3/8 impact, Ingersoll 1/2 gray plastic housing, red buttons...

CP for 3/8 ratchet, and Snap for 1/4" ratchet....

compressor is a CH from HD...12 years ago....belt driven 30 gallon of course....350 bux new....

I have about 100' of line hose on it, didn't bother with all the hard plumbing, also the drier is from HFreight...it works well....

biggest thing with air tools, is to squirt a dap of WD40 in the air chuck every once in a while...



Sockets, easy....hock shop once again....my 1/2 deep well impact is most often used, and they been running hard for some 20 years....a 80 buck local cheep tool house special from Taiwan ...damn things look new, and they busted their share of nutz...

your typical 12 point Sears sockets are not for anything....junk them and go to 6 points....

especially for impact use...
__________________
GENE

"Liberalism is a disease of the terminally stupid."


All products should say "Do not use if your stupid"




http://s1005.photobucket.com/albums/af176/mrvette72/

http://mrvette.shutterfly.com/vette2011

Last edited by mrvette; 12-25-2009 at 09:28 AM.
mrvette is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2009, 09:27 AM   #14
JackDidley
CF Senior Member
 
JackDidley's Avatar
 
Member Since: Sep 2003
Location: Database Error Indiana
Default

Read the specs on the tools and buy tools that match the compressor. Not all air tools are the same. If a tool is rated at 8 cfm, a 6 cfm compressor wont keep up. My favorite tool is a 1/4 drive air ratchet. Its a big time saver.
JackDidley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2009, 10:11 AM   #15
Jon Hekking
CF Senior Member
 
Jon Hekking's Avatar
 
Member Since: Jul 2007
Location: Salt Lake City Utah
Send a message via AIM to Jon Hekking
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by C41987 View Post
Get a commercial air compressor. Do Not get the oil-less ones. They will burn up with heavy use, ie.. impact or sanders. They are noisier, but will last a whole lot longer. The size will be determined by how much you intend to use it. A lot of sanding or impacting, I would recommend a 60 gal. I picked up one on clearance for under $400.
No offense to the Mac guy, but Sears tools (sockets and wrenches) are guaranteed for life, NO exceptions. I would definitely use their sockets and wrenches. Air tools are not included with this.
On impacts and ratchets, I think Snap-On or Mac are better than Sears. Buy the best you can afford.
You are correct, Craftsman will warranty your sockets and wrenches....over and over and over and over and over and over again. That's why professionals don't use them, they get tired of replacing broken tools every three times they use them, they are not high quality. True mechanics and techs that depend on their tools for their living don't use Craftsman, they stick to high quality product. I can't tell you how many times I've seen them spend $400 -600 for a good quality set of deep metric or standard socket sets. You get what you pay for at Sears, inexpensive import tools that don't hold up, but yes they will keep replacing them if you have the patience to do so..
Jon Hekking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2009, 10:37 AM   #16
PUNISHER VETTE
CF Senior Member
 
PUNISHER VETTE's Avatar
 
Member Since: Dec 2005
Location: Ephrata Pennsylvania
Default

How are the smaller air ratchets on normal bolts?

Like stated above i can see how a huge impact gun isn't going to fit into a lot of places that i'll be working on...other then the tires.

Now i've been changing my tires a LOT lately so this has most likely inspired my decision but maybe for other things an impact tool will just go unused most of the time?

I'd hate to spend hundreds of $$ then have it sit idle because it takes too long to fill the compressor, is too loud, and doesn't get into the spots i might use it in...

Last edited by PUNISHER VETTE; 12-25-2009 at 10:41 AM.
PUNISHER VETTE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2009, 10:43 AM   #17
mrvette
CF Senior Member
 
mrvette's Avatar
 
Member Since: Jul 1999
Location: Orange Park Florida
Default

I leave my compressor on all the time, that way it's ready to go when I am...just make sure there are no air leaks most air chucks do leak a bit so pull off the tool....

1/4" ratchet is very nice for small spaces/bolts....

but it's very seldom used, 90% of the time my 3/8 impact is the one....with 90% of the 1/2" used for tires, all my 1/2 impact stuff is deep well, with the single exception of a 15MM socket.....thanks GM...

I paint my sockets with a spray bomb....metric is unpainted in 1/4 inch...english is orange....

in 3/8, the metric is black, the english...unpainted....this makes for easy know for stow....

__________________
GENE

"Liberalism is a disease of the terminally stupid."


All products should say "Do not use if your stupid"




http://s1005.photobucket.com/albums/af176/mrvette72/

http://mrvette.shutterfly.com/vette2011
mrvette is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2009, 10:55 AM   #18
JackDidley
CF Senior Member
 
JackDidley's Avatar
 
Member Since: Sep 2003
Location: Database Error Indiana
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by PUNISHER VETTE View Post
How are the smaller air ratchets on normal bolts?

Like stated above i can see how a huge impact gun isn't going to fit into a lot of places that i'll be working on...other then the tires.

Now i've been changing my tires a LOT lately so this has most likely inspired my decision but maybe for other things an impact tool will just go unused most of the time?

I'd hate to spend hundreds of $$ then have it sit idle because it takes too long to fill the compressor, is too loud, and doesn't get into the spots i might use it in...

I use the 1/4 air ratchet for spark plugs. Break them loose with a normal ratchet and zip them out with air. Install them a couple turns by hand then zip them back in. DO NOT do this on #8 on a C4. I use it any time I have a lot of long bolts to r&r. Its fast and it doesn't have enough torque to over tighten anything.
JackDidley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2009, 11:10 AM   #19
fastbruce
CF Senior Member
Support Corvetteforum!
 
fastbruce's Avatar
 
Member Since: Mar 2005
Location: Troutman NC
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon Hekking View Post
You are correct, Craftsman will warranty your sockets and wrenches....over and over and over and over and over and over again. That's why professionals don't use them, they get tired of replacing broken tools every three times they use them, they are not high quality. True mechanics and techs that depend on their tools for their living don't use Craftsman, they stick to high quality product. I can't tell you how many times I've seen them spend $400 -600 for a good quality set of deep metric or standard socket sets. You get what you pay for at Sears, inexpensive import tools that don't hold up, but yes they will keep replacing them if you have the patience to do so..
With all due respect, You couldnt be more wrong, Ive been a mechanic for over 25 years and have bought and used Craftsman, Mac, Matco and Snap On, Most of my Sockets are Craftsman they have been as good as any and i dont have to pay 45 bucks for 1 God Da^m socket, Its the wanna, I have about 18 ratchets , a few Craftsman 4 Matco and the rest Snap on, you get the picture, I pay for all in cash and dont make payments on Tools, The only people I see Buying thousands of dollars of tools off the Mac Or Snap On trucks are young guys, and we Are sponsored By Snap On, I get my Box for free and 40% off tools, I haven't had to take a socket back to Sears in over a year, but I use common sense when I use my tools
fastbruce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2009, 11:15 AM   #20
blown87
CF Senior Member
GA Events Coordinator
 
blown87's Avatar
 
Member Since: Sep 2005
Location: Sharpsburg Georgia
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by O'Shark View Post
I'll say right off the bat that I hate oil-less direct drive compressors. The noise is very bad in a small to moderately sized shop. With that said though, one of these is probably all you need. I have a 5HP, 20 gallon Coleman Powermate direct drive unit that has helped roof a 15 square house as well as removed hundreds of lugnuts and lawnmower blades. I bought it 12 years ago and it has spent its life in unheated buildings. It works perfectly and while you will have to take a break and let it recharge itself if you really tax it, it will get the job done. If you are going to paint cars or do a lot of grinding, look for a 2 stage belt driven model. As for impact guns, I use an Ingersoll twin hammer gun that will break loose anything that I have need to work on at home. The downside is that it sounds like a top fuel dragster. Invest in a set of impact sockets for sure. Craftsman makes a good impact socket set.

In my professional life, I use Sioux impact guns for fasteners up to 25mm or so. I use only Snap-On impact sockets in both straight wall and universal styles. A few of the most basic swivel impact sockets should live in every gearhead's toolbox. For removing fasteners that have been torqued to 900nm or so, I use a Sioux Plarad 2-speed gear reduction gun. That thing is amazing. I can apply 800nm to a fastener with one hand . My company buys compressed air by the truckload. As for durability, I've had good reliability out of both the Sioux and Chicago Pneumatic impact guns.
???????
blown87 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2009, 11:15 AM
 
Go Back   Corvette Forum > Off Topic > Off Topic
Reload this Page Impact wrenches and air compressors, what's good?
 
 
 
Reply

Tags
200, air, aw612q, belt, compressor, driven, electric, forum, impact, interpret, ir, mac, reviews, run, specs, ss3l3, wrench


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Click for Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:34 AM.


Emails & Password Backup

Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.5.2