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General Z06 Corvette Discussion, LS6 Corvette Technical Info, Performance Upgrades, Suspension Setup for Street or Track Sponsored by
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Old 07-10-2005, 09:39 PM   #1
LTC Z06
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Default C5 Z06 Frequently Asked Questions(FAQ)

Not only are new post added, but I also add content to existing post; and because of a change you can add over 5,000 views to the views you see!
Feel free to correct me if I post incorrect info, but provide a link or proof.

Quick word search: Press control F and you will get a find box. Type in whatever you are looking for ie: brakes and zip right to the next mention of that keyword.

Table of contents:
Post #! Tranny info, fastener torque specs, alignment specs, and corvette forum acronyms
Post #2 Torsional rigidity and the fixed roof coupe.
Post #3 General C5 info
Post #4 Difference between 01 Z06 and C5
Post #5 Difference between 01 and 02 (02 & 03 the same)
Post #6 Difference between 02/03 and 04 and Z16 pkg
Post #7 Do you want to track or auto cross your Z06?
Post #8 C5 Tech tips
Post #9 2d Generation Active Handling
Post #10 2001 oil consumption problems
Post #11 C5 and general audio FAQ
Post #12 Steering Column Lock FAQs/Also known as, Pull key wait ten seconds
Post #13 How to lower
Post #14 Head CC volume vs Compression Ratio
Post #15 All the LS1/6 cam shaft info and head flow numbers
Post #16 Maximum tire sizes
Post #17 Ram air and cold air filter systems
Post #18 Gasoline and octane facts.
Post #19 C5 Heads Up Display Retrofit
Post #20 Install a CD Changer
Post #21 Engine and tranny oil discussions
Post #22 Aftermarket body pieces, paint, wheels, etc.
Post #23 How to add fog lights
Post #24 How to remove your license plate frame
Post #25 Flat tire repair and a spare for the Z06!
Post #26 Z06 cabin partitions
Post #27 How to read tire info
Post #28 DIC codes
Post #29 Will modifications void your warranty? MAGNUSON MOSS WARRANTY ACT
Post #30 2004 color production info
Post #31 Charge System Fault Message
Post #32 Z06 gas mileage
Post #33 Clutch pedal soft, sticks to the floor?
Post #34 8 inch subwoofer in the door
Post #35 Various Z06 accessories
Post #36 How to use a "Sharpie" pen to color lettering on your dashboard
Post #37 Campbell Hausfield air/water separator PVC mod
Post #38 C6 shifter in a C5
Post #39 Water dripping from AC under the dash
Post #40 Would you drive your Z06 in the snow?
Post #41 All the C6 Z06 specs are here
Post #42 How to change pads and rotors, and other brake info.
Post #43 History of the Corvette name and symbol
Post #44 Z06 and other wheel weights and sizes
Post #45 Picture Tutorial Helping YOU take better pictures of your C5
Post #46 Me at the Nurburgring
Post #47 Transmission service bulletin
Post #48 Scratch or damage a wheel?
Post #49 How to polish your Route 66 tips
Post #50 Is it Z oh 6 or Z zero 6?
Post #51/57/58 C6 Z06 brakes on a C5
Post #52 Differential/axle seal leaks?
Post #53 X or H pipe
Post #54 Ti vs Aftermarket HP difference? & How to polish your Ti exhaust tips
Post #55 How to distinguish between LS1 and LS6
Post #56 Is a Z06 just a C5 with bolt ons?
Post #59 iPOD your car
Post #60 Clear corner light install how to
Post #61 How to add tire pressure sensors
Post #62 Did this fall off your Z06?
Post #63 How to jack up your C5.
Post #64 Clutch issues and fluid changing.



I'll start:
The Tremec No. for a M6 is1386-000-023. Look at your tran. tag, and in the middle set of nos at the bottom of the tag will have 4 digits the first three coinciding with the last three digits in the Tremec no. If it is 023 is is a M6 if it is 025 it is a M12, Tremec no. 1386-000-025 Further there will be a sticker on the top of the trans. with DXB which I was told was indicative of a M12 only.

Tranny specs:
Coupe Z06
2.66 2.97
1.78 2.07
1.30 1.43
1.00 1.00
.74 .84
.5 .56

From David Farmer one of our World Challenge racers:

http://www.davidfarmerracing.com/c5-fuse.pdf C5 fuse layout-not year specific
http://www.davidfarmerracing.com/C5torque.PDF All engine/suspension/brake/drivetrain torque specs
http://www.metricchemical.com/align.PDF my diy alignment guide

http://www.metricchemical.com/fbody.pdf F-body torque sheet

and lastly, DTC (trouble codes) for C5's
http://www.davidfarmerracing.com/dtc-c5.PDF

I print these front/back, laminate, and keep in my tool box.


Wheel Alignment Specifications
RPO
Operation
Service Preferred
Tolerance

Front Alignment Specifications

All
Front Individual Toe
+ 0.04
+/- 0.10

All
Front Sum Toe
+ 0.08
+/- 0.20

All
Steering Wheel Angle
0.0
+/- 1.0

FE1 & FE3
Front Individual Caster
+ 7.4
+/- 0.5

FE1 & FE3
Front Cross Caster
Within +/- 0.5
--

FE1 & FE3
Front Individual Camber
- 0.20
+/- 0.5

FE1 & FE3
Front Cross Camber
Within +/-0.5
--

FE4 (Z06)
Front Individual Caster
+ 6.9
+/- 0.5

FE4 (Z06)
Front Cross Caster
Within +/- 0.5
--

FE4 (Z06)
Front Individual Camber
- 0.70
+/- 0.5

FE4 (Z06)
Front Cross Camber
Within +/- 0.5
--

Rear Alignment Specifications

All
Rear Individual Toe
- 0.01
+/- 0.10

All
Rear Sum Toe
- 0.02
+/- 0.20

All
Rear Thrust Angle
0.0
+/- 0.10

FE1 & FE3
Rear Individual Camber
- 0.18
+/- 0.5

FE1 & FE3
Rear Cross Camber
Within +/- 0.5
--

FE4 (Z06)
Rear Individual Camber
- 0.68
+/- 0.5

FE4 (Z06)
Rear Cross Camber
Within +/- 0.5
--

Corvette Forum Acronyms:
A4 – 4-speed Automatic Tranny
A6 - Automatic 6 speed tranny
AB - Auto Buffs
AFAIK - As Far As I Know
AH – Corvette Active Handling
ARE - Agostino Racing Engines
BBL - Be Back Later
BFD - Big...Fat... Deal
BFN - Bye For Now
BOHICA - Bend Over, Here It Comes
BPP - Breathless Performance Products
BRB - Be Right Back
BSOD - Blue Screen Of Death - the windows "Crash" screen
BSM - Body Side Moldings
BTW - By The Way
C1 - C6 = The 6 generations of the Corvette
CF - Carbon Fiber
CAI - Cold Air Intakes
COH - Corvettes of Houston
DILLIGAS - Do I Look Like I Give A S---
DILLIGAF - A more emphatic version of DILLIGAS
FI – Forced Induction
FRC – Fixed Roof Coupe
FRC - Fuel Rail Covers
FUBAR - "Fixed" Up Beyond All Recognition
FUD - Fear, Uncertainty, Doubt - BS intended to scare you about a product.
FWIW - For What It's Worth
FYI - For Your Information
g - grin - usually in brackets or angles <g> or [g]
bg - big grin
vbg - very big grin
vbseg - very big stuff eating grin
gd&h - grinning, ducking and hiding
gd&r - grinning, ducking and running
gd&r,vvf - grinning, ducking and running, very very fast
GMAB - Give Me A Break
GMAFB - a vehement version of Give Me A Break <g>
H/C – Heads Cam Pkg
HSIK - How Should I Know
HT - Hardtop (related to FRC)
IAC - In Any Case
IAE - In Any Event
IANAL - I Am Not A Lawyer
IBIWISI - I'll Believe It When I See It
IBTL - In Before The Lock
IBTM - In Before The Move
INAL - I'm Not A Lawyer
IMO - In My Opinion
IMHO - In My Humble Opinion
IMMHO - In My Most Humble Opinion
IOW - In Other Words
IYKWIM - If you know what I mean
JFYI - Just For Your Information
JMHO - Just My Humble Opinion
JMO - Just My Opinion
KMA - Kiss My ...Ahem....
LOL - Laughing Out Loud
LMAO - Laughing My <ahem> Off
LPE - Lingenfelter Performance Engineering
LTFSA - Leave The Fine Settings Alone
MN12 – Z06 6-speed
MN6 – Corvette 6-speed
NBD - No Big Deal
NBR - Nurburgring
NOYB - None Of Your Business
NOYDB - A forceful version of NOYB <g>
NOYFB - A an even more forceful version of NOYB <g>
NRN - No Reply Necessary
OIC - Oh, I See
OMG – Oh My God
OTL - Out To Lunch
OTOH - On The Other Hand
PFM - Pure Freaking Magic
PIMP - Peeing In My Pants (laughing so hard....)
PITA - Pain In The A**
PMFBI - Pardon Me For Butting In
PMFJI - Pardon Me For Jumping In
PMJI - Pardon My Jumping In
POS - Piece of S---
PTB - Powers That Be
RNA - Ring, No Answer (communication or telephone term for a problem)
ROFL - Rolling On Floor Laughing
ROTF - Rolling On The Floor
ROTF,L - Rolling On The Floor, Laughing
RSN - Real Soon Now
RTFM - Read The Fine Manual
RYFM - Read Your Fine Manual
SOTP - Seat Of The Pants
SNAFU - Situation Normal, All "fixed" Up
SW - Specter Werkes
TANJ - There Ain't No Justice
TANSTAAFL - There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
TC – Corvette Traction Control
TDNBW - This Does Not Bode Well
TIA - Thanks In Advance
TIC - Tongue In Cheek
TMTOYH - Too much time on your hands
TMI - Too much information
TMUI - Too much useless information
TPTB - The Powers That Be
TSTO - To Stupid To Operate
TTFN - Ta Ta For Now
TTT – To the Top (when posting to a thread to bring it back to the top)
TTYL - Talk (or Type <g> ) To You Later
UABFH - Use A Bigger Freaking Hammer!
VE - Vette Essentials
WAD - Working As Designed (... is a feature, not a bug)
WAG - Wild A-- Guess.
SWAG - Super or Scientific WAG
WAM - World According to MSFT (MicroSoft)
WGAS - Who Gives A S---
WGAF - A more emphative version of WGAS
WOA - Work Of Art
WOT - Wide Open Throttle
WSMM - Well Shut My Mouth (Southern Computers Only)
WTH - What The H---
WTF - What The F---
WCC - West Coast Corvettes
WYSIWYG - What you see is what you get
Y2K - year 2000
YHIHF - You Heard It Hear First
YMMV - Your Mileage May Vary THANK YOU MR. AND MRS. SULLY

Last edited by LTC Z06; 06-05-2006 at 12:27 PM.
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Old 07-11-2005, 06:37 PM   #2
LTC Z06
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Default Torsional rigidity and the fixed roof coupe.

From Scissors:

Corvette Torsional:
-Depending on the source, the Coupe is 22 or 23 Hz with the top on and 20.5 or 21 Hz with the top off
-Z06 is 24 Hz
-Convertible is 20 Hz

Why does the Z06 have a stiffer frame, is it the fixed roof? No, the fixed roof is just a glued on piece of plastic. It has the vert frame bracing added to the coupe frame.

And why did GM make the 99-00 FRC in the first place?
http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...post1551723778

Last edited by LTC Z06; 01-20-2006 at 07:39 PM.
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Old 07-11-2005, 10:54 PM   #3
LTC Z06
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Default Please go here for general C5 info:

http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...7&forum_id=103

Go here for TSB.
http://www.corvetteactioncenter.com/kb/index.php

Exhaust Jingle TSB.
http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...post1553056902

Gas gauge sticking?
Quote:
Originally Posted by y2kcorvettebob
Had the usually dreaded problemo with the Gauge. gauge drops off to zero at about 7/8 of a tank and doesn't come back up till 1/4 tank, and sometimes never comes back at all Short and sweet?? 4 bottles of Dry Gas at one time. Worked like a charm and the gauge has been functioning normally for 2 weeks and the beauty thing is that it is almost pure alcohol and wont hurt anything Total cost of repair? $3.72

Last edited by LTC Z06; 02-04-2006 at 10:56 AM.
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Old 07-12-2005, 11:43 AM   #4
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Default New for 2001 Z06

2001 Z06 Corvette - The Best Vette Yet?
By Joe Oldham (PM Mag.) - 3/18/2001
Pics courtesy of General Motors

Dave Hill, vehicle line executive and Corvette chief engineer, calls his new Z06 model "a car for the extreme driving enthusiast." Indeed, with a power-to-weight ratio of 8.09 pounds per horsepower, the Corvette Z06 is the quickest, fastest Corvette ever built. Yes, bar none. Our testing confirms that the Z06 goes from 0 to 60 mph in a strong 4.59 seconds and rips through the quarter-mile in 12.81 seconds at 111.19 mph. This clearly puts the Dodge Viper and Porsche Turbo into the sights of a Corvette Z06 driver in any given situation on the street or track.

Based on the former hardtop model already the lightest, stiffest and quickest Corvette Chevrolet claims it's not only the quickest, but also the best-handling production Corvette of all time, setting new standards in every part of the high-performance spectrum. The car is also a tribute to the first Corvette chief engineer, Zora Arkus-Duntov, himself a legend in racing. In fact, several of the designations used on the new car Z06 for the model name and LS6 for the engine are an homage to the man who shaped the car's history for many years.

LS6 Engine
Providing the grunt for all this performance is a new version of the venerable small-block engine that delivers almost 12 percent more horsepower than the 2000 LS1. Called the LS6, it shares many components with the LS1 found in every other 2001 Corvette, and would look the same as the LS1 were it not for its red engine covers.

The LS6 produces 385 hp at 6000 rpm, and torque of 385 ft.-lb. at 4800 rpm. The engine is redlined at 6500 rpm (versus the LS1's 6000 rpm redline), and its torque curve is slightly biased toward the upper end where that power will be most appreciated on the track. LS6 power output is achieved as the result of dozens of refinements to increase volumetric efficiency and maximum rpm.

Aluminum Block
The aluminum block casting on the LS6 deletes machined holes in the LS1 bulkhead and adds cast-in "windows" that allow better bay-to-bay breathing. On the downstroke, the pistons push air back toward the crankcase, creating backpressure or resistance, and that translates into parasitic horsepower loss because it resists piston motion. With the overtravel windows, air is allowed to move more freely between crankcase bays, thus relieving the unwanted pressure.

New Pistons
LS6 pistons are cast from high-strength M142 aluminum alloy and reshaped with a slightly different profile than those in the LS1. In side view, the LS6 pistons have a slight barrel shape, almost imperceptible to the naked eye. The new alloy increases engine durability at racetrack operating levels, while the shape reduces internal mechanical noise.

Increased Compression
The LS6's aluminum cylinder heads are cast with pent-roof combustion chambers that are smaller than the LS1's. Compression ratio increases from 10.1:1 to 10.5:1, improving thermal efficiency and increasing horsepower. Intake and exhaust ports in the LS6 head are refined and more precisely cast, contributing to the engine's overall increase in volumetric efficiency.

High-Profile Camshaft
The LS6-specific, steel-billet camshaft contributes more than any other single piece of hardware to the LS6's horsepower gain. In simple terms, the cam opens the valves quicker and allows more air to flow into the combustion chambers. Cam lift increases from the LS1's 12.7mm to 13.3mm.

Stronger Valve Springs
To accommodate valve operation with the high lift/long duration cam, the LS6's valve springs are stiffer and sturdier. They are made from the same steel wire as those in the LS1 but are wound tighter for a higher spring rate.

Fuel Injectors
Additional air flowing into the LS6 heads would serve no purpose without an equivalent increase in the amount of fuel to take advantage of it. New injectors increase maximum fuel delivery from the LS1's 3.3 grams per second to 3.6 grams per seconds, for a 10 percent improvement.

Internal PCV System
The LS6's application in the Corvette Z06 creates additional demands on the crankcase ventilation system. The Z06 is capable of cornering at more than 1 lateral g, requiring a special high-performance ventilation system.

To prepare the Z06 for all-out driving, the LS6's PCV system is moved into the engine's V, or valley. The unique aluminum valley cover incorporates composite oil-separating baffles and PCV plumbing. All of this reduces oil consumption during high-performance driving and, as an added benefit, also reduces the amount of external plumbing, eliminating potential oil-leak sources.

Exhaust Manifolds
Thin-wall cast-iron exhaust manifolds replace the previous stainless steel manifolds to improve durability, given the LS6 engine's potential for being involved in sustained high-speed driving.

Exhaust System
To further maximize the breathing capabilities of the LS6 and significantly reduce vehicle mass, a new titanium exhaust system was developed for the Z06. This marks the first-ever use of titanium in the exhaust system of a mass-production vehicle. The titanium portion of the Z06's exhaust system starts just forward of the rear axle, then goes over the top of the axle to the muffler. The entire muffler, all of its internal parts and exterior skin, the outlet pipes, including the exhaust tips, are constructed of titanium. The Z06 muffler is a completely new design featuring larger-diameter louver tubes inside the mufflers to reduce backpressure and provide less restriction for the exhaust gases flowing through the system. The exhaust tips are different too, with four 3.5-in.-dia. tips to visually set the Z06 apart from the standard Corvette.

Titanium offers a lower density than steel, and higher strength than either magnesium or aluminum at all temperatures. It reduces the Z06's weight by 17.6 pounds a whopping 50 percent reduction compared to the weight of the stainless steel exhaust system used on the Corvette coupe and convertible. In addition to easing exhaust gas restrictions, reducing mass and looking distinctive, this exhaust system sounds more aggressive than that of the standard Corvette. Considerable time and effort went into the design and tuning of the mufflers to ensure an exhaust note that would be unique to the Z06.

Powertrain Enhancements
In addition to providing more power and better fuel economy, Corvette engineers upgraded the operation and durability of the rest of the Corvette powertrain.

Stronger Driveshaft
The driveshaft is upgraded from a metalmatrix composite to aluminum alloy 6061, and it is increased in diameter from 55mm to 63mm. Driveshaft couplings have also been upgraded on manual-equipped models for additional strength and durability.

Not Z06 - Lighter Automatic Transmission Case
By optimizing the design of the automatic transmission case, Corvette engineers were able to trim some material and reduce thickness in some areas to reduce mass by 3.3 pounds.

Clutch
All Corvettes with the six-speed manual transmission (optional on coupes and convertibles, standard on Z06), feature a revised clutch with greater clamping power to accommodate increased engine torque. This new clutch design also provides for lower pedal effort, making manual-equipped Corvettes easier to drive.

M12 6-Speed Manual
This transmission is unique to the Z06, and is the only transmission available for that model. It is not available on Corvette coupes or convertibles. It has more aggressive gearing to increase torque multiplication in most forward gears, allowing for more rapid acceleration and more usable torque at higher speeds.

A transmission temperature sensor was added to protect the M12 from higher thermal stresses. The sensor warns the driver via the Driver Information Center with a TRANS OVER TEMP light if thermal loads become excessive, meaning that the transmission could be damaged if not allowed to cool down.

Gear Ratios
LS1/MM6 LS6/M12
1st Gear 2.66:1 2.97:1
2nd Gear 1.78:1 2.07:1
3rd Gear 1.30:1 1.43:1
4th Gear 1.00:1 1.00:1
5th Gear 0.74:1 0.84:1
6th Gear 0.50:1 0.56:1
Reverse 2.90:1 3.28:1


Synchronizers
Carbon blocker rings have been installed on all manual transmission forward gears to provide for smoother shifts and additional robustness.

Chassis Changes
For 2001, a Second-Generation Active Handling system, much enhanced over the original, becomes standard equipment on all Corvettes.

Pressure Modulator
The original Bosch 5.0 hydraulic pressure modulator is replaced by an improved Bosch 5.3 modulator. It is reduced in size, transmits less noise, and works better at low temperatures. It weighs 3.5 pounds less than the previous modulator and provides better apply response at lower temperatures (minus 20° Celsius), meaning that the system will become fully functional more quickly after a cold startup.

Dynamic Rear Proportioning
The enhanced system has dynamic rear brake proportioning capability, electronically balancing rear brake pressure to prevent rear brake bias, or lockup. This new software feature eliminates the need for a rear brake circuit-proportioning valve, resulting in fewer assembly parts and fewer brake pipe connections. In addition, the master cylinder pressure sensor is now integrated into the new Bosch pressure modulator.

Sideslip Angle Rate Control
Another upgrade for 2001 is the addition of sideslip angle rate control to Active Handling's core software algorithm. It senses whether the driver has been too slow (or too fast) to react to changing vehicle dynamics during evasive handling maneuvers, then dials in just the right amount of control to help maintain vehicle balance.

Coefficient Of Friction Estimation
Obviously, the rate at which a car tends to slip sideways is magnified on slippery road surfaces, so more sophisticated calibration algorithms have been developed to estimate the friction coefficient of the road surface and modify the Second-Generation Active Handling system's response accordingly.

Rear Brake Stability Control
Another software change results in better rear brake stability control. It assists the driver in maintaining control under light braking and high lateral acceleration conditions, such as might be encountered if a driver is caught off guard by a decreasing radius turn. This new feature more precisely releases brake pressure on the inside rear wheel during high lateral acceleration maneuvers and allows for more predictable vehicle response so the driver doesn't have to work as hard to keep the vehicle on its intended path.

Traction Control
As noted earlier, Active Handling works in conjunction with the traction control system, and for 2001 that part of the system has been much refined. A new control philosophy of targeting specific rear brake pressures and modulating engine torque around those points has resulted in fewer engine sags and superior vehicle acceleration when compared to the 2000 system. This new calibration allows drivers to enthusiastically experience Corvette's power and handling while still maintaining control over excessive wheelspin. Average drivers may now elect to leave the traction control system on when navigating autocross or gymkhana courses.

Competitive Mode
Corvette's Active Handling system has a unique feature called Competitive Mode, which allows the driver to disengage the car's traction control feature without giving up Active Handling's other benefits. Holding down the Active Handling button on the center console for 5 seconds enables Competitive Mode. This feature recognizes that, at the hands of a highly skilled driver, a bit of rear wheelspin may actually be desirable in autocross or other racing events. In previous years, it was necessary to bring the vehicle to a full stop to enable Competitive Mode. But for 2001, this requirement has been eliminated.

The Corvette's 2001 Second-Generation Active Handling system is smarter, less intrusive, and more adept at making the total driving experience precisely what Corvette owners have come to expect from their cars.

FE4 Suspension
The Z06 features a suspension system all its own designated FE4. It's not available on other Corvette models but is standard equipment on the Z06. It features a larger front stabilizer bar, a stiffer rear leaf spring, revised camber settings and unique shock calibrations, all engineered with a bias toward maximum control during high-speed operation. The suspension component specifications are:


Front stabilizer bar diameter (hollow): 30mm with 4.5mm-thick walls.
Rear transverse composite spring leaf: 125 N/mm versus 113 N/mm of the Z51.
Camber, front and rear: Z06: -0.75° (coupe/convertible: -0.25°).
The Z06's negative camber helps to keep the tire flatter in relation to the road, and raises the tire contact patch for greater grip while cornering. When coupled with other special Z06 components, the combination provides unparalleled, all-out racetrack performance, which is what the Z06 is all about. During development testing, Corvette engineers were able to generate racetrack speeds that improved Z06 performance by an average of 3 to 4 seconds per lap over last year's hardtop model on typical 2-mile closed-circuit road courses. This we were able to test for ourselves at the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course in Lexington, where we had the chance to drive a standard coupe and a Z06, back to back.

WheelsZ06 wheels are wider front and rear than those on the standard Corvette:

Wheel Size Comparison
2001 C5 2001 Z06
Front wheels 17 in x 8.5 in 17 in x 9.5 in
Rear wheels 18 in x 9.5 in 18 in x 10.5 in


The new wheels are also one of the visual identifiers for the Z06, letting onlookers know that this car is something special. They are uniquely styled, and are the most mass-efficient aluminum wheels ever produced for Corvette. They are painted a light metallic gray, and show off the Z06's red brake calipers, especially when the car is in motion. Each wheel's center cap has a red Corvette crossed-flags emblem for added identification when the car is at rest.

Tires
Goodyear has specifically designed new wider, stickier tires for the Z06. Called Goodyear Eagle F1 SC (Supercar) tires, they allow the Z06 to handle, brake and perform better than any production Corvette, ever. Sizewise, the new tires differ from the Goodyear Eagle F1 GS EMT tires on coupes and convertibles as follows:

Tire Size Comparison
2001 C5 Eagle F1 GS 2001 Z06 Eagle F1 SC
Front P245/45ZR17 P265/40ZR17
Rear P275/40ZR18 P295/35ZR18


While larger, these tires are much lighter than the EMT tires, reducing mass by a total of 10.6 kilograms (23.4 pounds). The new Eagle F1 SC tires have an asymmetric tread pattern to enable the fantastic cornering capabilities of the Z06. With the asymmetric pattern, the outside shoulder of the tire performs well in the dry, while the inside tread performs well in the wet. Taking mass out of the tires is extremely beneficial for wheel control because it reduces unsprung weight. It also reduces rotational mass, which improves acceleration and braking performance. Wheel control on the Z06 is also improved due to the more compliant sidewalls on these new, non-EMT tires.

Because these tires do not have the "run flat" capabilities of the EMT tires, it was necessary to develop a process for dealing with tire punctures, since Corvettes do not come equipped with a spare tire. In the case of the Z06, a GM Tire Inflator Kit is included that is capable of sealing punctures up to 5mm in diameter. The kit consists of a squeeze bottle filled with a non-flammable latex compound in an aqueous base, a nozzle that attaches to the tire valve, and a mini air compressor with a 12-volt adapter that plugs into the car's accessory power outlet. The kit functions safely in temperatures ranging from minus 20° F to 1400° F, under wet or dry conditions, and is easy, fast and clean to use. Similar inflator kits are successfully used by Mercedes and BMW, and Corvettes sold in Japan have been using this inflator kit since the introduction of the C5 in 1997. The latex compound in the tire inflator kits is not compatible with the tire valves used in Corvette's standard tire pressure monitoring system, so regular tire valves are used and that option is not offered on the Z06. There is a mass reduction of just over a half-pound as a result.



The Z06 receives several other refinements in addition to its unique engine, suspension, wheels and tires that either help it to be more functional or serve to differentiate its appearance, sometimes both.



On the Z06 only, both the windshield and backlite have been thinned to save weight. But resistance to stone chipping has been maintained. A total of 5.7 pounds was eliminated. There is cabin quietness as a result. But in a car like the Z06, we don't think anyone will care. Reducing the Z06's overall weight, boosting its power output by 40 hp, and broadening its operating range, made a significant improvement in the car's power-to-weight ratio. All told, Z06 is the lightest Corvette 38 pounds lighter than the former hardtop, 99 pounds lighter than the 2001 coupe and 95 pounds lighter than the 2001 convertible at just 3115 pounds. And remember, it's all about power-to-weight ratio. The result puts it in some very good company, as indicated in the chart.

Power-To-Weight Ratio Comparison
Mass HP Lbs/Hp
2000 BMW M 2899 240 12.1
2000 Audi TT 2655 225 11.8
2000 Porsche Boxster 2855 250 11.4
1999 C5 Coupe 3250 345 9.42
1995 Corvette ZR-1 3535 405 8.73
1999 Porsche GT3 2975 360 8.26
2000 Ferrari Modena 3241 395 8.21
2000 Porsche Turbo 3400 415 8.19
2001 Corvette Z06 3115 385 8.09
1999 Dodge Viper 3380 450 7.51


Having the best of both worlds reduced weight and increased power makes the Corvette Z06 a force to be reckoned with, on or off the track.

Air Management
Functional air inlets in the center of the front fascia deliver cool air to the intake system. New air scoops on the rear rocker panels funnel air to the rear brakes for better cooling. Z06 rear brake temperatures are reduced by as much as 10 percent under competition conditions. Brake fade and wear are greatly reduced.

Appearance
Z06 emblems are placed on the front fenders. Front and rear disc brake calipers on the Z06 are painted red. Inside, the Z06 includes a different instrument cluster with stylized graphics and a higher 6500 rpm redline.

The Z06's solid-black leather-trimmed seating surfaces include additional side bolstering to hold driver and passenger firmly in place during high lateral load maneuvers, and a Z06 logo is embroidered into the headrests. An optional interior with red accents on the seats, lower instrument panel and lower door panel is also available. In the glovebox, all Corvette owners will find a portfolio and a video that explains how (and how not) to use the car. The Z06 comes with its own unique portfolio, covering the features that are special to it. The Z06 video provides valuable tips on how to drive the car, including an interview with John Heinricy, famous Corvette engineer and race driver. The video also provides technical information regarding special GM High-Performance service parts that have been released for the car, such as special brake pads, additional chassis enhancements and a transmission oil cooler, plus other competition information. There is even information on driving schools where owners can go to learn to race, or hone their existing skills.

Testing
Every GM car and truck is subjected to certain durability test schedules, and Corvettes go through all of them. Then the fun begins. Corvette has a well-earned reputation for being a car that you can drive out of the showroom and onto a racetrack with little or no modification. To protect that reputation, Corvette engineers do things to the car that would tighten the sphincter muscle of the average driver. All Corvettes, not just the Z06, undergo 250 miles of full-bore autocross testing, 24 hours of road-course testing at competition speeds, and a grueling wide-open throttle test that has the car run at its 175-mph top speed until the gas tank runs dry about 30 minutes later. No question, the Z06 comes up as a very special version of a very special car. Somewhere, Zora Arkus-Duntov is smiling.

Last edited by LTC Z06; 01-20-2006 at 07:45 PM.
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Default Changes from 2001 to 2002

New for 2002 Z06

LS6 engine (Z06 model) receives 20 horsepower increase, to 405 hp, and receives 15 foot pounds more torque for a total of 400 lbs. ft. of torque
Pre-cat deletion
Revised rear shock valving
Aluminum front and rear stabilizer bar links
Aluminum transmission cooler case
Magnesium wheels no longer available (coupe and convertible)
Z06 wheels are now cast aluminum, not forged aluminum
Head-Up Display (HUD) now standard
Cam/Valve/Spring change
Electron Blue exterior color

Model Lineup Engine Transmission
Coupe 5.7-liter V8 w/ 4-speed automatic (S) 350 hp (LS1) 6-speed manual (O)
Convertible 5.7-liter V8 w/ 4-speed automatic (S) 350 hp (LS1) 6-speed manual (O)
Z06e 5.7-liter V8 w/ 6-speed manual 405 hp (LS6)


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

For Release: June 20, 2001
CHEVROLET BUILDS THE QUICKEST Z06 CORVETTE EVER, AT 405 HP, AND REFINES COUPE AND CONVERTIBLE
DETROIT - For nearly 50 years, the Corvette has had a special place in America's garage. Crafted from a precise blend of power, performance, style and comfort, Corvette's success has been based on a willingness to embrace advancing technology while remaining true to its heritage. Today's Corvette exemplifies this philosophy like no other.

More Power
Last year's introduction of the Z06 Corvette, based on the former hardtop model and the legendary 1960s Z06 option package, is aimed at true performance enthusiasts at the upper end of the high-performance market. And now, an extra boost of 20 hp, to 405, makes Z06 the quickest production Corvette ever.

This upgrade to the LS6 engine's output is the result of new hollow stem valves, a higher-lift camshaft, a low restriction mass air flow (MAF) sensor and a new low restriction air cleaner design. Eliminating the PUP converter from the exhaust system enables better flow of spent gasses and reduces vehicle weight, without compromising Corvette's NLEV (National Low Emission Vehicle) status.

Suspension Upgrades
The Z06-specific FE4 High-Performance suspension system features a larger front stabilizer bar, a stiffer rear leaf spring and specific camber settings - all calibrated for maximum control during high-speed operation. The 2002 model year Z06 also has new rear shock valving for a more controlled ride.

Although retaining the same design and color finish, the unique aluminum Z06 wheels are now produced using a cast rather than a forged process. The magnesium wheel option for Coupes and Convertibles is no longer available.

Maximum Agility
The foundation of Corvette's agile handling is hydroformed frame rails. Its four-wheel independent front suspension features cast aluminum upper and lower A-arms. The Z06 and models equipped with the available Z51 package now have aluminum front stabilizer bar links for lighter weight. A transverse leaf spring system is used for the independent rear suspension.

All Corvettes have the second-generation Active Handling system as standard equipment. The system features dynamic rear brake proportioning to prevent rear wheel lockup; rear brake stability control to assist the driver in maintaining control under light braking and high acceleration conditions; integral traction control calibrated to allow drivers to experience the vehicle's power and handling while maintaining control over excessive wheelspin. It also has an on/off switch and a "Competitive Mode" which allows the driver to disengage the traction control feature without giving up Active Handling's other benefits.

Additional Refinements
Now standard on Z06, the Corvette's Head-Up Display (HUD) projects vehicle speed and many other gauges digitally on the windshield ahead of the steering wheel, enabling drivers to keep their eyes on the road. HUD remains an option on Coupes and Convertibles.

For 2002, the transmission cooler case is constructed of lightweight cast aluminum, replacing the previous stainless steel design.

Corvette's exterior color palette adds Electron Blue, replacing Navy Blue Metallic previously offered on Coupes and Convertibles. Electron Blue also takes the place of Speedway White as one of five choices on the Z06.

2002 CHEVROLET CORVETTE SPECIFICATIONS
Overview


Model: Chevrolet Corvette: Coupe, Convertible, Z06 (hardtop)
Body Style/driveline/configuration: Two-door hatchback coupe, convertible and fixed-roof coupe, rear-drive, front-engine
Body material: Composite
EPA vehicle class: Two seater
Manufacturing facility: Bowling Green, Kentucky
Key competitors: Audi TT, BMW Z3, Dodge Viper, Porsche Boxster and Boxster S, Porsche 911

Engines
5.7L (LS1) V8 5.7L (LS6) V8
V8 Application: STD on Coupe, Convertible STD on Z06
Type: 5.7-liter OHV
Block Material: Cast aluminum
Displacement (cu in/cc): 350 / 5665
Bore x stroke (in/mm): 3.90 x 3.62 / 99.0 x 92.0
Cylinder head material: Cast aluminum
Valvetrain: Overhead valve, two valves per cylinder
Fuel delivery: SFI
Compression ratio: 10.1:1 10.5:1
Horsepower/kilowatts: 350 / 261 @ 5600 rpm 405 / 302 @ 6000 rpm
Torque (lb-ft/Nm) 375 / 508 @4400 (manual)
360 / 489 @4000 (automatic) 400 / 542 @ 4800 rpm
Recommended Fuel 91 Octane
Maximum Engine Speed 6000 rpm 6500 rpm
Emission control system: Catalytic converter AIR
EPA Estimated Fuel economy (mpg city/hwy/comb) 19/28/23 (manual transmission on coupe and convertible
18/25/21 (automatic transmission on coupe and convertible) 19/28/23 (manual transmission Z06)

Transmissions
4-speed automatic 6-Speed manual 6-Speed manual
Application: Std. on coupe and conv. Opt. on coupe Std. on Z06 only.
1st Gear 3.06 2.66 2.97
2nd Gear 1.63 1.78 2.07
3rd Gear 1.00 1.30 1.43
4th Gear 0.70 1.00 1.00
5th Gear -- 0.74 0.84
6th Gear -- 0.50 0.56
Reverse 2.29 2.90 3.28
Final drive 2.73 (std) / 3.15 (opt) 3.42 3.42

Chassis/Suspension
Front: Short/long arm (SLA) double wishbone, cast aluminum upper & lower control arms, transverse-mounted composite leaf spring, monotube shock absorber
Rear: Short/long arm (SLA) double wishbone, cast aluminum upper & lower control arms, transverse-mounted composite leaf spring, monotube shock absorber
Stabilizer Bar diameter (mm/in): Std. - 19.1 / .75, F45: - 19.1 / .75, Z51: - 21.7 / .85, FE4: - 21.7 / .85
Traction control: Electronic Traction Control, Active Handling
Steering type: Speed sensitive power-assisted rack-and-pinion
Steering ratio: 16.1:1
Turns lock-to-lock: 2.66
Turning circle (feet / meters): 40.2 / 12.1

Brakes
Type: Power-assisted disc with ABS, front and rear
Front: 12.6 x 1.26-inch (325 x 32-mm)
Rear: 11.8 x 1.0-inch (305 x 6-mm)
Swept Area: Front-263 sq. in., 1696 sq. cm
Rear-158 sq. in., 1018 sq. cm

Wheels
Coupe and Convertible: Z06
Front: 17 X 8.5 17 X 9.5
Rear: 18 X 9.5 18 X 10.5
Type: Cast Aluminum (Std) Forged Aluminum, High Polish (Opt.) Cast Spun Aluminum
Tires
Front: P245/45ZR-17 P265/40ZR-17
Rear: P275/40ZR-18 P295/35ZR-18
Type: Goodyear Eagle F1 GS, extended mobility Goodyear Eagle F1 SC, Asymmetric Tread

Exterior Dimensions
Coupe Convertible Z06
Wheelbase (in/mm): 104.5 / 2655.5
Overall length (in/mm): 179.7 / 4565.6
Width (in/mm): 73.6 / 1869.4
Height (in/mm): 47.7/ 1211.5 47.8 / 1214.7 47.7 / 1211.5
Front Track (in/mm): 61.9 / 1572.3 61.9 / 1572.3 62.4 / 1584.5
Rear Track (in/mm): 62.0 / 1574.5 62.0 / 1574.5 62.6 / 1589.5
Curb Weight (lbs/kg): 3246 / 1458 3248 / 1456 3118 / 1414
Weight Distribution (f/r): 51 / 49 53 / 47
Interior Dimensions
Seating capacity: 2
Head room, front (in/mm): 37.9 / 963 37.8 / 960
Shoulder room, front (in/mm): 55.3 / 1405
Hip room, front (in/mm): 54.2 / 1377
Capacities
Cargo volume (cu ft/liters): 24.8 / 702 13.9 / 394 13.3 / 377
Fuel tank capacity (gals/liters): 18.5 / 70.0
Engine oil w/ filter (qts/liters): 6.5 / 6.15
Engine coolant (qts/liters): 11.5 / 10.9 (automatic) 11.8 / 11.2 (manual)

CORVETTE TESTING DESIGNED TO RETAIN "AMERICA'S FAVORITE SPORTS CAR" ICON STATUS
WARREN, Mich. - Chevrolet Corvette has been called "America's favorite sports car" for its ability to deliver proven power and performance in a production model. At Chevrolet, we take great pride in Corvette's status and work diligently to ensure it will remain a source of automotive awe and inspiration for years to come. That is why Corvette is subjected to the same general durability testing as all other General Motors vehicles. Then, it's tested even further, with three additional tests - 250 miles of autocross, 24 hours on the racetrack and top speed at wide-open throttle - to ensure that America's sports car is ready for high-performance use.

Autocross
The autocross portion of the testing includes 250 miles on an autocross course. It takes about five fuel tank loads to complete the 250 miles, with a total vehicle inspection at every fuel stop. Instrumentation monitors everything, from oil pressure to transmission temperature. This test is a precursor to the 24 hours on a race track.

24 Hours on the Racetrack
After the autocross test, Corvette spends 24 hours at competition speeds on a road course.

"It's really the equivalent of 24 individual sprint races, each lasting one hour," explains Mike Neal, Corvette ride and handling chassis development. "It takes about an hour at track speed to consume a tank of fuel. The car then comes in; we check and top off fluids, replace brakes and tires, download our instrumentation and send the car out again. We do this until the car has completed 24 hours on the track."

The 2.2-mile road course used to validate the '02 Z06 consists of a 120-mph straightaway, 90-mph sweeping curves and 40-mph hairpins. The drivers make 12 shifts per lap and brake 10 times per lap. "Compared to the 2001 Z06, the 2002 model is half a second faster around our test track," adds Neal.

Throughout the testing, equipment monitors and records 30 channels of thermal information from critical components and fluids. In addition to the temperature readings, other pertinent data is collected and analyzed, including, oil pressure, engine rpm, vehicle speed, lateral acceleration, as well as fore and aft acceleration.

"For the Corvette, this additional testing is essential in validating the robustness of the vehicle for racing application," explains Neal. "In the case of the 2002 Z06, the track-testing phase was key in helping us determine that a new clutch design was needed."

The clutch of the 2001 Z06 had already been enhanced to deal with the increased power of the LS6 (over the LS1); with the additional power of the 2002 LS6, a new clutch design was developed to ensure long life and good performance.

"Our 24 hours of at racing speeds is an invaluable complement to our normal durability testing," says Dave Hill, Performance Cars vehicle line executive and Corvette chief engineer. "It's one test that is severe enough to give Corvette the robustness our owners expect. It's what makes Corvette stand out among the competition."

Top Speed Wide-Open Throttle
To simulate high-speed, autobahn conditions, Corvette is subjected to a wide-open throttle test on our five-mile circle track at the Milford Proving Grounds in Milford, Michigan. Starting with a full tank of gas, the car is driven flat-out at its 171-mph top speed until the fuel tank is empty - approximately 30 minutes. The test validates the car's ability to withstand extreme thermal loads reliably.

Validating Performance

"It's important to keep in mind that with Corvette - and especially with the Z06 - buyers are purchasing a vehicle that has been thoroughly tested under all conditions, "emphasizes Dave Hill. "Our rigorous testing ensures that the Corvette can be put through its paces on the race track and still serve as reliable transportation in everyday situations. This testing further adds to Corvette's legend as America's favorite sports car."

2002 Z06 CORVETTE IMPROVES ON PERFECTION
WARREN, Mich. - To say that the 2001 Chevrolet Z06 Corvette was launched to wide-ranging acclaim is an understatement, the Z06 has won the hearts of Corvette aficionados everywhere. For many, the 2001 Z06 represented as close to perfection as has ever been achieved in a sports car. It has been received with unprecedented praise for its ability to deliver performance, agility, and control - all wrapped in a visually stunning package. For 2002, Chevrolet engineers have provided a new definition of perfection.

Corvette has been synonymous with performance for nearly 50 years. Proving that you can never have too much of a good thing, GM engineers extracted an additional 20 horsepower from the LS6 engine that debuted in 2001. For 2002, the LS6 delivers an awe-inspiring 405 horsepower at 6,000 rpm.

"We could have chosen to remain satisfied with our achievements for 2001, instead, we set our sights on breaking the 400-horsepower barrier," said Dave Hill, Performance Cars vehicle line executive and Corvette chief engineer. "At 405 horsepower, the LS6 will match the highest peak power level of the legendary 5.7-liter DOHC LT5, which powered the ZR1 Corvette."

More Torque = Better Performance
"When you hear customers talking about wanting more power, what they really mean is that they want more torque. It' s torque that gets you going, whether launching from a standstill, or accelerating out of a corner. At 385, last year's Z06 was already in an elite class. For 2002, we've upped the ante with another 15 pounds-feet of torque, for a total of 400 pounds-feet at 4,800 rpm. The result is one that must be experienced to be appreciated," said Hill.

The Z06 will continue to be outfitted with the unique six-speed manual transmission for 2002. It will enable skilled drivers to achieve 0-60 mph times of 3.9 seconds and to cover a quarter mile in 12.4 seconds at 116 mph. By comparison, the 2001 powertrain combination achieved 0-60 mph in 4.0 seconds and the quarter mile in 12.6 seconds at 114 mph.

LS6 Clutch Improvements
To withstand the greater torque output of the new engine, the LS6 clutch was redesigned. Clamp load has been increased seven percent and durability has been augmented by the following enhancements:

The clutch-driven disc was redesigned, with the flange plate thickness increased by 20 percent - from 5 mm to 6 mm . The damper springs were redesigned to increase wind-up rate, from 33 Newton-meter degrees to 35 Newton-meter degrees . Premium alloy steel wire is now used for the damper springs.

These changes ensure long life and good performance for the LS6 clutch.

World-Class Agility and Handling

"While the 2002 Z06 is the quickest Vette to date, the Corvette team never lost sight of the fact that the Z06 is a total performance package. With this goal in mind, the suspension has been improved to keep the Z06 the well balanced sports car that it is, and the standard against which all other sports cars are measured," said Hill.

The valving of the Z06's rear dampers was also revised, allowing for smoother, more efficient transfer of the additional horsepower and torque to the pavement.

"Revising the damping allowed us to improve the track performance of the Z06, as well as its everyday ride quality," said Mike Neal, Corvette ride and handling development engineer.

In addition to generating more power, Corvette engineers also scrutinized every possible means to reduce vehicle mass, which in turn results in improved vehicle handling. Their efforts resulted in:

Cast aluminum front stabilizer links (versus rolled rod steel links), resulting in a 0.2 kg (0.44 lbs.) weight saving
Cast-spun aluminum wheels (versus forged aluminum), for a total mass savings of 0.6 kg (1.3 pounds)
These are further enhancements to the world-class FE4 suspension system that debuted in 2001.

A Solid Foundation

"The 2002 Z06 Corvette is the complete package, a vehicle that can be driven at the limit with supreme confidence. It's a true driver' s car, designed to provide the driver with the information and feedback required for enthusiastic driving," said Hill.

This latest Z06 builds upon the solid foundation established by the previous model-year offering, one that had already raised performance to a whole new level. The 2001 Z06 introduced a standard Second-Generation Active Handling system, providing a great deal of assistance to the Corvette driver and an added level of safety to occupants.

The 2001 Corvette coupe, convertible and Z06 models broke new ground in the areas of refinement, with better noise isolation, better idle quality, reduced maintenance costs and improved fuel economy.

Greater emphasis on performance is further enabled with a standard Head-Up Display (HUD) for 2002 Z06 models. It provides critical vehicle information - including tachometer, vehicle speed, oil pressure, coolant temperature and fuel gauges, among others - promoting a "hands on the wheel, eyes on the road," philosophy.

"We realize that the Z06 is not for everyone. But, for the extreme performance enthusiasts, the race-bred 2002 Z06 provides them with a vehicle that challenges the threshold of performance and handling, with absolutely no compromises," stated Tadge Juechter, Performance Cars assistant chief engineer. "The 2002 Z06 is a total performance package!"

VETTE FANS RECEIVE HISTORIC POWER BOOST
PONTIAC, Mich. - The 2002 5.7-liter Overhead Valve (OHV) LS6 engine for the ZO6 Corvette will be rated at 405 horsepower. The increase of 20 horsepower equates to 71 horsepower per liter in this 5665 cc engine - the highest output yet in a Gen III small-block.

The new LS6 V8 delivers 405 horsepower at 6000 rpm and 400 lb-ft of torque at 4800 rpm. To achieve this additional power the engine received modifications including a revised air cleaner housing, low restriction Mass Air Flow (MAF) sensor, lightweight valves, higher lift camshaft and an exhaust alteration.

The component modifications that enable the additional 20 horsepower and 15 lb-ft of torque (compared to 2001) all focus on getting more air into and out of the engine. Increasing the volume of air in and out ultimately creates more power.

Air first enters through the air cleaner housing. The new air box opening to the air cleaner increases by approximately 6.65 square inches (43 cm2). This additional Volume contributes to more horsepower.

The new MAF sensor no longer has pre-sensor grid work known as air channels. Induction air thus flows less restricted through the mass air flow sensor and into the intake manifold.

Gases flowing into and out of the combustion chamber pass by new hollow stem valves. The stems of the exhaust valves are filled with a liquid sodium alloy. Since the exhaust valves operate at a much higher temperature than the intake valves, the liquid alloy enables better transference of heat from the exhaust valves to the valve guides and then to the engine coolant. The valves reduce valvetrain mass by approximately 368 grams. This lighter weight allows the valves to keep contact with the cam at higher speeds.

The new cam profile is the greatest contributor for the increased power. The new profile allows the intake and exhaust valves to open .7 mm further. This key change enables more air to be pumped in and out, which equates to more power. Each camshaft is induction hardened and straightened to an accuracy of ten microns to ensure it spins true in the engine. All 16 lobes are inspected using opto-electrical technology with submicron level precision.

For 2002, the ZO6 will eliminate the use of dual pup catalytic converters found immediately downstream from the exhaust manifolds. Eliminating these converters allows for increased exhaust flow out of the engine. The under floor catalytic converters have been modified to make up for the pup converters and still meet NLEV emissions standards.

With 405 horsepower the LS6 will match the highest peak power level of the legendary 5.7-liter DOHC LT5 which powered the ZR1 Corvette from 1990-1995. For OHV V8 fans and the engineering community this is a significant milestone.

The LS6 was made possible by using the Gen III architecture introduced in the 1997 LS1. This new small-block variation included features such as a deep skirt aluminum block, cross-bolted mains, internally balanced crank, electronic throttle control and coil-near-plug ignition. The Gen III small block retained the simplicity of OHV design and built in appropriate advanced engine technologies.

Commenting on the new power level Assistant Chief Engineer John Juriga said: "With the advent of the '02 OHV LS6, GM Powertrain continues to prove its ability to deliver power and performance in a small package and exceed customer expectations."

SAM WINEGARDEN INTERVIEW ON THE 2002 LS6
Sam Winegarden, chief engineer for GM Powertrain's small block team, was recently interviewed on the launch of the 2002 LS6. The LS6 is the 5.7L V8 engine for the ZO6 Corvette which will break the 400 horsepower mark. Sam has been chief engineer for the small block program for over three years.

1. Can you describe what it's like to work on the small block program?

If you talk about imaging and brands and that kind of thing there's nothing longer living, better recognized than the small block Chevy. When you come to work here your working on an icon. You're also working on the heart and soul of the Corvette and almost every truck we make. Virtually half of GM's North American volume and a large part of its profits centers around the small block. It's fun but it's pretty sobering. You're in charge of a legend.

We've been really energized around here with the introduction of the new LS6. Producing horsepower is always exciting and generates a tremendous amount of enthusiasm. The ability to match the LT5 certainly generated a lot of enthusiasm for the team, I mean it's another step, another level of performance in the history of the small block and the team was pretty enthusiastic about going after that. It was a lot of fun.

2. With 405 HP in the LS6 you've surpassed a lot of the muscle car era's gross power levels [1968 L79 327 - 350 HP, 1969 L46 350 - 350 gross horsepower, 1970 LT1 350 - 370 gross horsepower] with these kinds of numbers - that's definitely an achievement...

John Juriga (assistant chief engineer) and his team have done a really nice job with what you could call the ruthless pursuit of horsepower. The small block team has done an excellent job of bringing every bit of horsepower they could out of it. To say the least, the accomplishment is thrilling to be a part of.

3. You've achieved comparable power to the legendary LT5 with an OHV design. Any comments on this historic achievement and its impact on the industry?

It's just one more step in a long and very storied and successful history of the small block. The team is just continuing to perform at an outstanding pace. From an industry perspective I think one thing it tells you is that there is more than one way you can design an engine to achieve the power. The conventional wisdom out there will tell you that you need to have a four valve overhead cam arrangement and that is just simply not the case. You can make it work either way and I think John and the team have shown that. From an industry perspective it just tells you that the push rod small block has a bright future, and there's more where that came from.

4. Do you think this power boost will resonate well with the Vette fans?

Absolutely. 20 HP doesn't ring like it's a really big number but when you actually drive the vehicle, to quote Dave (Dave Hill, Corvette Chief Engineer and VLE), "it makes the car really come alive."

5. Did you meet the Corvette team's requirement for power and torque levels?

Yes, actually we exceeded them a little bit. The objective was 400 we got 405.

6. Having been the Chief Engineer for GM's Premium V engine family [which includes the Cadillac's Northstar and Oldsmobile's 4.0L and 3.5L engines] for 10 years, what type of engineering processes are carrying over into the small block?

There's a lot of synergy in several areas, one of them is our Bill of Design. Bill of Design is basically a guideline of best engineering practices established over our collective life to get the best possible design. Now granted one family of engine is a four valve and one is a two valve push rod, ones overhead cam and one's cam-in-block. Many elements of the Bill of Design on things like cylinder head design, block design and piston design carrys over regardless of a particular architecture, so there' s a lot of similarities there. One of my favorite examples is the structure on the bottom end of both the Vette and the Premium V. While there are two different solutions there, one's a deep skirt with a six bolt arrangement and one's a bed plate, both of them are just outstanding from bottom end structure and both followed our Bill of Design. The small block is probably the most robust lower end I've ever seen, bullet proof. The team did just a superb job there.

7. What do you think the guiding philosophy should be in the development of engines for the Corvette?

Well the first thing, the Corvette has to be the best performance value on the road,period - so of course you have to concentrate on the power. The other thing that you have to do is integrate the engine into the vehicle. If you just make raw power and don't get it integrated into the vehicle correctly then it's not going to be very pleasing and frankly the vehicle won't be very exciting. Working with the Corvette team has been a pretty rewarding experience because together we've been able not only to make that kind of legendary performance number but package it in a vehicle that's actually very refined for the level of performance that you're getting. The overriding principle is: It's got to be done in a quality manner, making the horsepower then breaking engines is not a good plan.

8. For '02 the LS6 increased 20 HP. Why didn't you just give that last year when the LS6 was introduced?

To be bluntly honest with you, we weren't quite ready. There were some valvetrain issues we needed to work on. Reducing the mass of the valves and working with the aggressive ramp rates on the cam were challenging. There were other challenges obviously but I think the valvetrain was the trickiest to get solved and balanced. We're not going to do this thing if we don't have a quality solution in hand. Not having resolved those issues in the final weeks before '01 production we agreed to do it as a two step process, '01 and '02. So it was purely a case of when we were ready. We're still not selling wine here before it's time.

9. Did you ever consider expanding the bore or stroke ever?

Some of the learning from the power development in this program is destined to show up in future model years.

10. The rpm limit of 6600 rpm is impressive for this pushrod V8. Why is the LS1 (in the base Corvette) fuel cutoff at 6200?

We've reached a threshold around 6200 rpm where we needed to reduce the weight of the valves to avoid fluttering. When you have a heavier valvetrain one of the things you trade away is some of the higher rpm capabilities and you end up having to limit the speed, thus the lower speed of the LS1. It's a trade off of how much power you want to make versus how much fuel economy and/or how smooth and quiet you want it to be and that's a balance we struck with Dave's team.

11. The LS6 beauty covers are red, distinguishing it from the LS1. Was there any discussion on visually distinguishing the 2002 from the 2001 LS6?

No. However the engine is getting credit on the exterior of the car. There will be a badge with "405" integrated into the ZO6 logo.

12. What is the volume projection for the 2002 LS6?

We will start at 20 percent of production at Bowling Green, and see what the demand is for this special model. Either way, the St. Catharines engine facility will be locked in and produce what we need.

13. Did removing the pup converters create more emissions?

No, we took care of that by improving the under-floor converter. Converter technologies is one of the good technical stories unfolding across all GM Powertrain that we were able to take advantage of. It obviously helped us with our power by cutting the back pressure in the exhaust system which is always a good thing to do.

14. Will this version of the LS6 still operate fine with regular fuel? Is premium fuel still recommended?

Yes, premium is still recommended and yes, it operates just fine with regular - the ESC [Electronic Spark Control] system adapts to it. There is of course a slight degradation in performance. The two areas where you'll lose a little performance is at low speed heavy load and then at top end. Pulling the spark back will reduce the torque a little. Driving around town you won't really notice. On the track yes, but around town just use a little more pedal because there's a lot there.

15. What's your favorite year Corvette?

The '02 Z06. If you can't get out of that car with a grin on your face you' re in the wrong business.

16. Then what's your second favorite?

The 1963 Stingray. Historically, that's the one I like best.

Original 02 ZO6 Car & Driver test.
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Was browsing around and found this nice little test of our baby..Posted some pretty good numbers..

http://www.caranddriver.com/article...5&page_number=1
In 2003, Chevy's steel, aluminum, resin, and glass-fiber wondercar will turn 50. That's an impressive feat for a car few thought would make it out of the Eisenhower decade. We are already living in fear of the commemorative decal package in which GM must be planning to mummify America's favorite sports car.
Message to GM and Chevy: Just don't do it! From our viewpoint, they're already celebrating. Why else would the bow-tie crew add 20 horsepower to the most powerful Corvette without significantly raising the price? That's right, the Z06 Corvette now pounds the pavement with 405 horsepower. The base price climbs only $1650 (pretax) to an out-the-door price of $50,844.

Oh, sure, you can buy a car with more horsepower, but expect to shell out greenbacks quicker than Phillips at a topless carwash. The next rung on the horsepower and price ladder is the $74,050 460-hp Dodge Viper GTS ACR (soon to be upgraded with a 500-hp model, but no word on price) followed by the $118,098 415-hp Porsche 911 Turbo.
To hear Chevy engineers tell it, wringing 20 more horses from the aluminum V-8 was far from rocket science. They installed a larger air-cleaner, a less-restrictive mass airflow sensor, and a higher-lift camshaft to pump more air through the engine. In addition, the intake-valve stems are now hollow (for lighter weight), and the exhaust-valve stems are filled with a liquid sodium alloy to aid cooling. Finally, exhaust back pressure was reduced by the removal of the small and restrictive catalytic converters that were mounted in the exhaust manifolds. New, more effective downstream cats allow the Z06 to meet NLEV standards. Horsepower increases to 405 hp at 6000 rpm, and torque goes up 15 pound-feet to 400 at 4800 rpm.

This incremental horsepower allowance is typical of Chevy, and we wouldn't be surprised if it's saving another power injection in case Corvette sales tank in the next few years.
But horsepower is only one side of the performance equation. The other side, weight, is not likely to change until the next-generation C6 rolls out. In this characteristic, however, the Vette is already quite impressive. Despite an extremely roomy interior and usable trunk, the 2002 Z06 weighs 3181 pounds, about 300 pounds less than the Porsche Turbo and 250 pounds shy of the Viper GTS.

A weird thing happened the first time we tested the newly fortified Z06 ("Supertuner Challenge," September 2001). The 405-hp 2002 Z06 was surprisingly less spry than the 385-hp 2001 Z06. We guessed that a slippery launch surface was to blame, so we acquired another example for more tests.
We were right. The updated Z06 obliterates the previous one. Zero to 60 mph your thing? The new car scampers there in four seconds flat, 0.3 second quicker than the quickest '01 Z06 we tested and only 0.1 behind the four-wheel-drive 911 Turbo.

In the quarter-mile there's an even bigger difference. The new car did it in 12.4 seconds at 116 mph, whereas the 385-hp car needed 12.7 seconds to hit 113 mph. For an only five-percent increase in power, the new Z06 certainly extracts quite a bit. For the record, both cars we're comparing here were tested by the same driver using the same test equipment.


A ringer? Perhaps, but Chevy claims the car will sprint to 60 mph in 3.9 seconds—0.1 second quicker than what we achieved. We couldn't match the company's times for the 2001 Z06, either, but this time we're much closer, exactly matching the time and speed predicted for the quarter-mile. During our "Supertuner Challenge," we learned that at least one GM guy, John Heinricy, can bang off clutchless upshifts. It's very possible our 60-mph time is a tick off simply because we use the clutch for every upshift.



As one would expect, braking remains excellent, with only 160 feet required to stop from 70 mph, and the latest Z06 spins around the skidpad with 0.96 g of grip.
Chevy says the only chassis change involved tinkering with the rear shocks. Although midcorner bumps send the back end skittering, the Z06 is as compliant as sports cars get.

Twenty more ponies didn't transform this car; they only strengthened what we already knew: The Z06 is a keeper at any price. There's more performance available than anyone but the gifted or highly skilled can take advantage of, yet the Z06 is still comfortable and quiet enough that your guest won't require bribes to ride along.
Despite its extra poundage, we'd prefer the prettier hatchback body, with its more flexible luggage space, to the notchback shape all Z06s are saddled with. That and the somewhat flimsy seats are all there is to complain about. Otherwise, Chevy has hit a home run that keeps sailing farther out of the park.

A Hib Halverson article on the new 2002 Z06 with pictures!
http://www.c5registry.com/2k2z06/

An engine and 2002 C5 specs
Here is a link to all the general specs from the corvette action center.

http://www.corvetteactioncenter.com...ory.php?catId=6

Thanks dwjz06!

Last edited by LTC Z06; 01-20-2006 at 08:20 PM.
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Old 07-12-2005, 11:47 AM   #6
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Default Three threads about 04 differnces from 03.

http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...ght=difference

http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...es&forum_id=49

http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...post1551656017


Z16 option package
from xilr8n
• Unique Le Mans Blue Metallic exterior paint
• Unique carbon-fiber hood
• Black interior with Commemorative seat embroidery
• Special exterior badging
• Polished Z06 aluminum wheels with Commemorative center caps
• "C5-R Le Mans" stripe scheme

The hood weighs 20.5# the stock hood 31.1#

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Old 07-12-2005, 11:48 AM   #7
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Default Do you want to track or auto cross your Z06?

Read this thread in the racing section.

http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...66&forum_id=23

Spring rates for Z06 and Z51
http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...68&forum_id=23

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Old 07-12-2005, 12:15 PM   #8
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Default Many questions can be answered in C5 Tech tips.

http://www.corvetteforum.com/techtip....php?TopicID=1

Quote:
Originally Posted by theadmiral94
In Other Words -- how to lift and support your C5 per the GM Manual

This article will translate and document the GM Manual’s procedures for lifting and supporting a C5 (based on a 2000) and clearly define the distinction between a ‘hydraulic jack’ and where it can be placed -- versus -- ‘jack stands’ and where they can be placed.

This is not to say other suggested procedures would not work without damage.

However, after struggling through so many different suggested procedures and the manual, I decided to put this together to help the next 'new to them' owner of a C5.


The goal of this write-up is to accurately convey the GM Manual’s information so anyone can determine if a suggested procedure deviates from GM recommendations.

This information is taken from GM’s 2000 Service Manual, Volume 1 of 3, General Information, pages 0-33.

I should also credit two other websites for their information, upon which some of this article is based :
The Idaho Corvette Page and Z06vette.com

First, to identify some large differences between many suggested procedures and what the GM’s manual recommends. The GM Manual states or implies:

1. ‘Jack Stands’ should NOT be placed under the ‘frame rails’ (regardless of whether ‘hockey pucks’ are used or not).

2. A ‘hydraulic jack’ should NOT be placed directly under the CENTER of the ‘OPTIONAL’ front cross-member. The ‘Optional’ Front cross-member is FORWARD of the front fiberglass transverse spring and is the ‘optional’ front location for a ‘hydraulic jack’. By contrast, the ‘PREFERRED’ front location is to the REAR of the fiberglass transverse spring, immediately forward of the oil pan. This 'PREFERRED' cross-member can have a 'hydraulic Jack' placed directly under the center, however, doing so will most likely contact and may damage the oil pan/oil drain plug, so it is NOT advisable either.

3. A ‘hydraulic jack’ should NOT be placed directly under the CENTER of the rear cross-member to raise the rear of the car.

4. ‘Hockey Pucks’ should NOT be used at the FRONT Frame Rail location when lifting the car with a ‘service lift’. The presumably larger flat rectangular ‘service lift’ ‘pad’ is to be placed with its long side parallel with and at or immediately forward of the front ‘hockey puck’ AREA (note: this also assures a slightly higher rear end for proper oil draining from the oil pan).


Now on to what can be done.

First of all, here is the Service Manual’s vehicle diagram of the “Vehicle Lifting and Jacking Locations” (note: Jacking is NOT ‘Jack Stands’):

personal home page Lifting & Jacking Locations

The Service Manual has 3 sections within the ‘Lifting and Jacking the Vehicle section’. These sections can be easily switched and thereby confusing.

The FIRST SECTION is ‘Vehicle Lifting – Frame Contact Hoist’ (i.e. a ‘service lift’). This section clarifies the use of the ‘hockey pucks’ (special part # J43625) ONLY for the REAR, to be installed in the ‘rear frame rail shipping slots’. The presumably larger flat rectangular ‘service lift’ ‘pad’ is to be placed with its long side parallel with and at or immediately forward of the front ‘hockey puck’ AREA (without a ‘hockey puck’) AND not touching the body panels.

The SECOND SECTION ‘Vehicle Jacking’ (‘Hydraulic Jack’, not to be confused with ‘Jack Stands’ or a ‘service lift’) implies the use of ‘hockey pucks’ front and rear by specifying the use of “2 ½ inch or smaller diameter lifting pads when ‘jacking’ the car via the ‘frame rails’.

For the FRONT, this ‘Vehicle Jacking’ section continues to specify the ‘Preferred’ Front Suspension cross-member as the one behind the fiberglass transverse spring, immediately forward of the oil pan. This cross-member can be lifted anywhere along its width (center to 13” off-center), with the preferred location at the outer 7 ½ inches (and in the middle of that outer 7 ½ inches). Note, the usage of the ‘Preferred’ cross-member may make oil changes difficult as the cross member is more narrow at the center where it comes very close to the oil drain plug.

Further specified in this ‘Vehicle Jacking’ section is that the Front ‘Optional’ front cross-member should only be lifted at the outer 5 ½ inches of the overall 26 inch cross-member’s length and NOT in the center (when you look at the cross-member, you will understand why).

For the REAR, Similarly specified is that a ‘hydraulic Jack’ should NOT be placed in the center, it should only be placed at the outer and rearward sweeping 5 ½ inches (of the overall 26 inch length cross-member) (again, when you look at the cross-member and how it supports the body, you will understand why).

The THIRD SECTION ‘Supporting the Vehicle with Jack Stands’ first notes “Important: Do not place jack stands under the frame rails”.

It further specifies that ‘Jack Stands’ should only be placed under the outer areas of the three previously mentioned cross-members. Also, a ‘block or pad’ should be placed between the jack stands and the vehicle. Lastly, make sure the ‘jack stands’ ‘block or pad’ span at least 2 cross-member ribs (i.e. side to side thin aluminum ridge).


Some Personal notes/thoughts:

The cast aluminum cross-members should only be lifted with specially constructed wood ‘pads’ to prevent damage and possible cracking.

The car’s underbody is very low. There is only approximately 3½ inches clearance below the front air dam, and only about 5 inches below most of the underbody, cross-members and side rails.

This low clearance creates a requirement for front and rear drive-on ramps with a minimum of 3” of lift to gain clearance to the cross-members for ‘jacking’ with specially constructed wood ‘pads’ and a low-profile hydraulic jack (e.g. #0950240 from Sears with 3¾” to 18½” lifting range). Always first lift the front, otherwise there will not be enough clearance to do so after lifting the rear.


Now on to what you can make out of wood to comply with the GM Service Manual.

Here's a link to pictures of the home-made items:

Wood Ramps and Hydraulic Lifting Pads


Home Made Wood Ramps:

§ Two 12 foot 2” x 12”
§ One 8 foot 2” x 3”
§ One box of #10 x 3” wood screws

Front: cut off 1’ from the worse end of the first 2” x 12” and set aside. Then cut two 3 ½’ and two 2’ sections.

Rear: cut off 1’ from both ends of the other 2” x 12”, then cut two 3’ and two 2’ sections.

Both: cut eight 12” lengths for stop-blocks from the 2” x 3”. Four are for placing behind the tires after driving onto the ramps.

Cut a 30 degree angle on one end of each of the ten 2” x 12” sections. This can be done with a table-saw set at 30 degrees and each board held vertical (standing up) while passing between the guide and another guide/piece of wood (I used the first 1’ section set aside, clamped to the table).

Otherwise, if you only have a hand-held electric circular saw (which cannot cut the proper 30 degree angle on a vertical end as when set flat on the board, its 30 degree setting will actually cut a 60 degree ramp instead), then instead just cut a 45 degree angle on one end of each of the ten 2” x 12” sections.

Assemble front ramps: 12” 2”x3” stop-block on square end of 2’ 2”x12” on top of 3 ½’ 2” x 12”. Pre-drill and screw together (2 screws for stop-block, 4 screws for 2’ to 3½‘).

Assemble rear ramps: 12” 2”x3” stop-block on square end of 2’ 2”x12” on top of 3’ 2” x 12”. Pre-drill and screw together. The two additional 1’ 2” x 12” sections are for placing under the tires after jacking to elevate the rear for proper oil draining. However, there may not be sufficient clearance to driver all the way off of the 3 levels, so you could roll off the 3rd level, then remove the 3rd level board before continuing down off the rest of the rear ramps.

Usage: Place the FRONT ramps with the stop block where you want the front tires to end up. Pull car just up to the ramp incline. Push the ramps up against the front tires and align the front ramps. Place the REAR ramps 6” in front of the rear tires and align (I use a 6” piece of wood as a spacer against the tire). Back car up without hitting any front mud flaps on rear ramps and accelerate smoothly. The car should hit the front ramp’s 1st level, then the rear ramp’s 1st level, then front and rear ramp’s 2nd levels almost simultaneously. Be sure the car is against the stop-blocks and set parking brake. Then set the four additional stop blocks behind each tire.

NOTE: The front ramps are only 3 ½‘ long to be clear of the ‘hockey puck’ area, in case it is needed for ‘hydraulic Jacking’. The rear ramps are only 3’ and set 6” forward of the rear tire to prevent hitting both ramps at the same time thereby reducing the chance of their movement and insufficient speed to achieve making the 2nd level of both ramps.


Home Made Wood Hydraulic Jack Lifting Pads

Here's a link to pictures of the home-made items:

Wood Ramps and Hydraulic Lifting Pads


§ One 8 foot 2” x 6”
§ One 8 foot 2” x 8”
§ #10 3 inch wood screws

NOTE: The 'optional' Front wood lifting pad may be needed to be able to reach and use the Front 'recommended' cross-member and its wood lifting pad, especially when using the above mentioned 3 inch ramps and the above mentioned Sear's hydraulic jack. (i.e. lift/support at 'optional' cross-member, then lift/support at 'recommended' cross-member for long-term storage or extensive work).

For FRONT ‘Optional’ cross-member: cut two 6” sections, and one 26” section from the 2” x 6”. Assemble each 6” section on top, flush with the ends and parallel with the 26” section. Pre-drill and screw together.

When used on the ‘Optional’ front cross-member (area forward of the fiberglass transverse leaf spring), center the wood (side to side and front to back) with the 6” sections on top against the cross-member and contacting both front and rear ‘RIB’ with the hydraulic jack centered underneath the 26” section. Pre-drill and screw together. This way lifting pressure will NOT be applied under the center of the cross-member, only the ends, as specified by the GM Manual.

For FRONT ‘Recommended’ cross-member: cut two 8” sections and one 26” section from the 2” x 8”. Assemble each 8” section on top, flush with the ends and parallel with the 26” section. Pre-drill and screw together.

When used on the ‘Recommended’ front cross-member (area behind the fiberglass transverse leaf spring and immediately forward of the oil pan), center the wood (side to side and front to back) with the 8” sections on top against the cross-member and contacting both front and rear ‘RIB’, with the hydraulic jack centered underneath the 26” section. This way lifting pressure will NOT be applied to the middle of the cross-member where the wood would overlap the oil pan and oil drain plug. This could also allow still doing the oil change while the wood is in place.

‘Jack Stands’ should only be used with these wood lifting pads, placed underneath the ends of the 26” section on either side of the hydraulic jack (‘Jack Stands’ should NOT be placed under the ‘hockey pucks’ on the frame rails).

For REAR cross-member: Cut two 10” sections and one 26” section from the 2” x 6”. Assemble each 10” section on top, at each end, but perpendicular to the 26” section, somewhat centered, except that 3” should extending rearward of the 26” section, and 1½“ should extending forward of the 26” section (looks like a ‘U’ with downward legs when assembled).

When used on REAR cross-member, center (side to side and front to back) the 26” section on the center of the rear cross-member directly under both ‘ribs’, with the 10” sections upward and against the cross member and pointing rearward so as to ALSO be underneath the cross-member ends which are more rearward (tie-rod ends). Place the hydraulic jack centered underneath the middle of the 26” section. This way lifting pressure will NOT be applied under the center of the cross-member, only the ends, as specified by the GM Service Manual.

‘Jack Stands’ should only be used with this wood lifting pad, placed underneath the ends of the 26” section and centered below the 10” sections on both sides of the hydraulic jack (‘Jack Stands’ should NOT be placed under the ‘hockey pucks’ on the frame rails).

Set the rear ‘jack stands’ one (1) notch higher than the front ‘jack stands’ for a level car.

Set the rear ‘jack stands’ two (2) notches higher than the front ‘jack stands’ when performing an oil change (will level/slightly tip the oil pan to fully drain the oil).
Quote:
Originally Posted by Twil1ght
As many of you have run into the EBCM failure (DIC code C1214 - Sol Valve relay Contact or coil CKT Open) and the infamous Service Traction Control/Service Active Handling/Service ABS - and let's not leave out the "shame you into the service center" lights that won't go off the dash, I thought I'd take a minute to say I just replaced my EBCM.

I got the part from gmpartsdirect.com for nearly half what the stealership wants for it. And as far as putting it in - you could grab 2 or 3 kids off the short bus and let all of them take turns following your instructions and the slowest one would take about 30 minutes. It's a complete joke. I did mine from the topside and wouldn't even have had to get under the car except that I dropped a bolt and had to pick it up off the ground.

Put the part in, turned key to on position, watched the lights go off after a month of looking at them, checked for codes, system has joy - Did a quick test with competitive driving, perfect results - time for a beer.

EDIT: The instructions I used:


Click the image to open in full size.
Removal Procedure

1. Turn the ignition switch to the OFF position.
2. Disconnect the EBCM harness connector.
3. Remove the two insulator nuts.
4. Lift the EBCM/BPMV out of the bracket high enough to
allow clearance to remove the insulator mounting bolt and
the EBCM.
5. Remove the insulator mounting bolt from the EBCM.
6. Remove the four EBCM to BPMV bolts.
7. Separate the EBCM from the BPMV by gently pulling apart
until
separated.
8. Carefully remove the seal.
The seal may by reused if it is not cut or damaged.

Installation Procedure

1. Clean the BPMV seal surface with alcohol using a clean
rag.
2. Install the seal to the BPMV if it is not cut or damaged.
3. Install the EBCM to the BPMV.
4. Tighten the four mounting bolts in the following equence:
- First pass to 27 inch Ibs.
- Second pass to 53 inch Ibs.

Important: If the insulator nut was removed it must be replaced with a new insulator nut.

5. Install the front EBCM insulator mounting bolt. Tighten
the bolt to 10 ft. Ibs.
6. Install the EBCM/BPMV into the bracket.
7. Install the two insulator nuts. Tighten the two insulator
nuts to 89 inch Ibs.
8. Connect the EBCM harness connector. Important: Both
sides of the EBCM harness connector must be engaged
with lever before closing.
9. Turn the ignition switch to the ON position; do NOT start
the engine.
10. Perform the Diagnostic System Check - ABS. (Don't let this scare you - this basically means let the car do what the car does, and show you that everything is OK with the system, and then investigate the DIC codes which should be cleared)

Last edited by LTC Z06; 03-25-2006 at 04:38 PM.
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Old 07-13-2005, 06:55 AM   #9
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Default 2d Generation Active Handling

Awesome job Ranger! Thank You!

Second-Generation Active Handling
For 2001 a Second-Generation Active Handling system, much enhanced over the original, becomes standard equipment on all Corvettes. Following is a summary of specific changes:

New Pressure Modulator
The original Bosch 5.0 hydraulic pressure modulator is replaced by an improved Bosch 5.3 modulator. It is reduced in size, transmits less noise, and works better at low temperatures. It weighs 3.5 pounds less than the previous modulator and provides better apply response at lower temperatures (-20 degrees Celsius), meaning that the system will become fully functional more quickly after a cold start-up.

Dynamic Rear Proportioning
The enhanced system has dynamic rear brake proportioning capability, electronically balancing rear brake pressure to prevent rear brake bias, or lockup. This new software feature eliminates the need for a rear brake circuit-proportioning valve, resulting in fewer assembly parts and fewer brake pipe connections. In addition, the master cylinder pressure sensor is now integrated into the new Bosch pressure modulator.

Sideslip Angle Rate Control
Another upgrade for 2001 is the addition of sideslip angle rate control to Active Handling's core software algorithm. It senses whether the driver has been too slow (or too fast) to react to changing vehicle dynamics during evasive handling maneuvers, then dials in just the right amount of control to help maintain vehicle balance.

Coefficient of Friction Estimation
Obviously, the rate at which a car tends to slip sideways is magnified on slippery road surfaces, so more sophisticated calibration algorithms have been developed to estimate the friction coefficient of the road surface and modify the second-generation active handling system's response accordingly.

Rear Brake Stability Control
One more software change results in better rear brake stability control. It assists the driver in maintaining control under light braking and high lateral acceleration conditions, such as might be encountered if a driver is caught off-guard by a decreasing radius turn. This new feature more precisely releases brake pressure on the inside rear wheel during high lateral acceleration maneuvers and allows for more predictable vehicle response so the driver doesn't have to work as hard to keep the vehicle on its intended path.

Better Coordination with Traction Control
As noted earlier, Active Handling works in conjunction with the traction control system, and for 2001 that part of the system has been much refined. A new control philosophy of targeting specific rear brake pressures and modulating engine torque around those points has resulted in fewer engine sags and superior vehicle acceleration when compared to the 2000 system. This new calibration allows drivers to enthusiastically experience Corvette's power and handling while still maintaining control over excessive wheelspin. Average drivers may now elect to leave the traction control system on when navigating autocross or gymkhana courses.

"Competitive Driving" Mode
As aluded to in the previous paragraph, Corvette's Active Handling system has a unique feature called "Competitive Mode", which allows the driver to disengage the car's traction control feature without giving up Active Handling's other benefits. Holding down the Active Handling button on the center console for five seconds enables Competitive Mode. This feature recognizes that at the hands of a highly skilled driver a bit of rear wheelspin may actually be desirable in autocross or other racing events. In previous years it was necessary to bring the vehicle to a full stop to enable Competitive Mode, but for 2001 this requirement has been eliminated.

Taken as a whole, the Corvette's 2001 Second- Generation Active Handling system is smarter, less intrusive, and more adept at making the total driving experience precisely what Corvette owners have come to expect from their cars. It makes the car more agile, allows average drivers to perform better during spirited driving, and provides a new margin of safety in emergency situations. Source: http://www.c5registry.com/zo6/Performance/AGILITY.HTM


“The system also allows the driver to select a "COMPETITIVE DRIVING" mode for autocross or gymkhana competitions. In this mode, the Active Handling system remains fully-functional -- measuring steering, yaw rate and lateral acceleration inputs as well as applying individual wheel brakes as required – but the traction control system is disabled, allowing for some wheelspin and oversteer that skilled drivers often find beneficial in competitive driving.

Source: The text appeared in a GM Press Release that was issued at the Las Vegas SEMA Show in the Fall of 1998. The Active Handling System, RPO JL4, debuted on the 1998 Corvette and became standard equipment on the 2001 model. http://corvetteactioncenter.com/tech...ehandling.html

In mid-1998 a new feature called Active Handling was introduced on Corvette. It is a sophisticated stability control system that utilizes on-board sensors to measure yaw, lateral acceleration and steering wheel position, then brings into play the capabilities of Corvette's standard ABS brake and traction control systems to smoothly assist the driver in maintaining vehicle control in oversteer or
understeer situations.

For 2001 a Second-Generation Active Handling system, much enhanced over the original, becomes standard equipment on all Corvettes. With a new Bosch brake pressure modulator and many new or revised calibrations, Second-Generation Active Handling provides even more assistance to the Corvette driver.

Corvette engineers know how Corvette owners like to drive their cars, so a stability control system that would shut the car down too severely during enthusiastic driving was out of the question. Second-Generation Active Handling calibrations have been carefully developed to limit such intrusiveness. Aside from an "Active Handling" message on the instrument panel, drivers will not even realize they've been assisted in most situations.

Average drivers will find themselves capable of producing even lower elapsed times in autocross competitions. Above-average drivers will appreciate Active Handling's Competitive Mode, which allows them to switch off the traction control part of the system.

In addition to making all Corvettes more agile, Second-Generation Active Handling adds a cushion of safety given its ability to help out in emergency situations. It deftly senses both over- and under-correction on the driver's part and adjusts to help bring the car back into balance.

As good as it is, Active Handling cannot overcome the laws of physics. It is offered only as an assist - albeit an assist that makes Corvettes a lot more agile, and even safer - but it is not a cure-all for every situation. Ultimately, drivers must still take full responsibility for control of their vehicle.

All Corvette models for 2001 benefit from the previously mentioned second-generation active handling system. Along with the Delphi suspension software, the latest system uses a new Bosch 5.3 brake pressure modulator and is intended to be less intrusive in extreme situations. "It adapts itself to the skill level of the driver," says development engineer Mike Risso. "We want people to keep this system on, not turn it off and then be without it when they get in over their heads."

A further change for 2001 is that the active handling's competitive mode, which allows drivers to switch off the traction control element of the system, can be activated on the move instead of after a full stop. [source: http://www.autofieldguide.com/column...m/0900mcc.html

Maximum Agility
The foundation of Corvette’s agile handling is hydroformed frame rails. Its four-wheel independent front suspension features cast aluminum upper and lower A-arms. The Z06 and models equipped with the available Z51 package now have aluminum front stabilizer bar links for lighter weight. A transverse leaf spring system is used for the independent rear suspension.

All Corvettes have the second-generation Active Handling system as standard equipment. The system features dynamic rear brake proportioning to prevent rear wheel lockup; rear brake stability control to assist the driver in maintaining control under light braking and high acceleration conditions; integral traction control calibrated to allow drivers to experience the vehicle’s power and handling while maintaining control over excessive wheelspin. It also has an on/off switch and a “Competitive Mode” which allows the driver to disengage the traction control feature without giving up Active Handling’s other benefits.
Source: http://www.corvettemuseum.com/specs/2002/index.shtml


In addition:
Active handling warming up
http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...56&forum_id=49

Last edited by LTC Z06; 08-06-2005 at 06:13 PM.
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Old 07-13-2005, 08:31 PM   #10
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Default Some threads about 2001 oil consumption problems.

http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...il&forum_id=49
http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...se&forum_id=49
http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...se&forum_id=49
http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...se&forum_id=49
http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...se&forum_id=49

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Old 07-13-2005, 09:14 PM   #11
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Default C5 and general audio FAQ

http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...59&forum_id=20

Some great how to's:
http://www.frankhunt.com/

Last edited by LTC Z06; 05-01-2006 at 03:55 PM.
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Old 07-13-2005, 09:24 PM   #12
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Default Steering Column Lock FAQs

Also known as, Pull key wait ten seconds.

http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...483&forum_id=1

Last edited by LTC Z06; 08-05-2005 at 09:18 AM.
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Old 07-13-2005, 10:10 PM   #13
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Default How to lower.

http://www.frankhunt.com/FRANK/hobbi...5_Lowering.htm

The link has pics.

Lowering the C5 Corvette
using the "ride height adjustment bolts"

Based on various postings on various forums the prevailint opinion is that you can lower the rear of your C5 up to about 1" and the front to 3/4" safely with the stock bolts if you have the Z-51 suspension. If you have the base suspension (FE1) or the Continuously Variable Real Time Damping (F45) suspension, opinions on the net (not backed up with any facts) suggest that damage to the suspension may occur if FE1 or F45 suspensions are lowered this far. Some kind of undefined, serious damage can occur if an F45 car is lowered. No one has said what kind of damage or how serious or where it occurs, etc. Could be an urban legend, I suppose.
I checked with automotive author and C5 guru Hib Halverson who said: "Both Delphi and the Corvette Team people told me that F45 has a problem with lowered cars and increased damping, i.e.: the car rides more stiffly." and "I think you can use the spring jack screws to lower the car as much as that will allow. Then road test the car, if you don't like the ride, simply crank up the adjustment again." Followed by: "There won't be damage to the shocks. What I was told is that the F45 system "sees" the decrease in ride height and sometimes increases damping during normal driving where ordinarily there would be no increase." Keep in mind that F45 cars have base springs. Softly sprung cars may have more of a problem with lowering than will Z51s.

So, based on my research, it appears that you can lower the FE1 and F45 about 1/2" in the front and rear safely. Adjusting both front and rear bolts to their maximum will give you approximately 3/4" in the front and 1" in the rear (this will vary from car to car). While this does not sound like much, it makes the car look and feel a lot lower. My air dam was 2" off the road after the procedure. I am considering either cutting off the lower one inch of the air dam or raising the car about 1/2" so it won't scrape so much.

Before starting, measure the height of the front and rear wheel wells from the ground through the center of the wheel. It should be somewhere around 27-3/8" in front and 28-5/8" in the rear. Remember these numbers. Some suggest that the rear lowering can be done without raising the car - well, I'm too big to get under my car unless it is raised - so, the procedure is outlined below.

Lowering the Rear:

1. With the car on a level surface and the front wheels blocked, jack the rear of the car and support with two jack stands. It is actually easier to do the lowering if the wheels are removed, especially when it is time to measure the bolt height to ensure that the car will be level (you might want to remove the wheels now also).

2. At each end of the transverse leaf spring, locate a long bolt, with the threaded up pointed upward. You should see about 1 inch to 1-1/2 inches of exposed thread on the bolt (this is on the top of the leaf spring). Using an 18 mm socket and ratchet on the bottom of the bolt, tighten (clockwise) until there are only two or three threads exposed on the top part of the bolt. Use an 18 mm wrench to hold the top nut in place as you turn the bolt.

Rear Before
Rear After

3. Leave two or three threads exposed before it contacts the nut. The nut has a small "C" clip on it so it won't back out. It takes about 5 minutes per side to lower the rear about 1". It is a good idea to measure the exposed threads on each side to ensure they are the same.

Lowering the Front: The front, the car definitely has to be raised.

1. With the car safely raised and on jack stands and the front wheels removed, find the end of the transverse leaf spring next to the shock. Locate the 10 mm end of the ride height adjustment bolt. It has a retainer clip.


Front Before

2. With some suspensions (like the F45) it is easier to get at the top of the bolt if the lower shock absorber bolts (13 mm) are removed so the shock can be moved out of the way.
3. Using a 10 mm socket on the top of the stud, turn counter-clockwise (like unscrewing - even though you are not, you are just on the opposite end of the bolt so it looks that way) until tight.
4. Back off the bolt about a 1/8 to ¼ turn to ensure it does not freeze in place in case you want to raise the car at some future date.

Front After

5. Re attach the lower shock mounts, put the wheels back on and remove the jack stands.

At this point, the car may not appear to have been lowered very much. Take it for a drive around the block and allow things to settle (and it *will* settle quite a bit). Then, with the car parked in the same spot, re-measure the height of the wheel wells as above. The difference between the two measurements is the amount the car was lowered. Make sure that both sides of the front and rear measure the same. Adjust as necessary.

Drive the car for a week or so then have the alignment checked by a good shop. Align as necessary. If the car feels like the suspension is riding on the rebound bumpers, you may be too low - The best fix is to raise the car by about ¼" and test driving again.

How will lowering affect the car?http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...21&forum_id=49

Last edited by LTC Z06; 05-01-2006 at 03:53 PM.
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Old 07-13-2005, 10:24 PM   #14
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Default Head CC volume vs Compression Ratio

Head CC volume vs Compression Ratio:
________________________________________ ______

The below CR numbers are with the stock GM 5.7L displacement LS1 graphite head gaskets installed.

Installing the thicker 2003 GM MLS head gaskets will decrease your compression ratio by approx 0.1 - 0.2

72.27cc = 9.1 CR
71.71cc = 9.2 CR
71.05cc = 9.3 CR
70.59cc = 9.4 CR
70.03cc = 9.5 CR
69.74cc = 9.6 CR
68.91cc = 9.7 CR
68.35cc = 9.8 CR
67.79cc = 9.9 CR
67.23cc = 10.0 CR
66.67cc = 10.1 CR (stock LS1 head spec)
66.11cc = 10.2 CR
65.55cc = 10.3 CR
64.99cc = 10.4 CR
64.43cc = 10.5 CR (stock LS6 head spec)
63.87cc = 10.6 CR
63.31cc = 10.7 CR
62.75cc = 10.8 CR
62.19cc = 10.9 CR
61.63cc = 11.0 CR
61.07cc = 11.1 CR
60.51cc = 11.2 CR
59.95cc = 11.3 CR
59.39cc = 11.4 CR
58.83cc = 11.5 CR
58.27cc = 11.6 CR
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Old 07-13-2005, 10:26 PM   #15
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Default All the LS1/6 cam shaft info you could ever want.

http://www.ls1tech.com/forums/showthread.php?t=327734

and:
Here is one from our resident expert DJWorm.

Year - Engine - Part # - Lift (I/O) - Duration - Lobe Sep. - Timing

2001 - LS6 - 12560950 - .525/.525 - 204/211 - 116 - 118/114
2002+ - LS6 - 12565308 - .555/.551 - 204/218 - 117.5 - 120/115

LS1 - ASA - 12480110 - .525/.525 - 226/236 - 110

Hot Cam LS6 - 12480033 - .525/.525 - 219/228 - 112

SS Cam LS6 - 88958606 - .570/.570 - 239/251 - * - **/**

*Unsymetrical Lobe flank
For best torque set intake to TDC @ 105 degrees
For best power set intake to TDC @ 106.5 degrees

**Cam Timing @ 0.050" lift 106 degrees intake to TDC
(Must use 2002 and later hollow stem valves)

Notes:
Assumes all use 1.7:1 rocker arms.
Net lift is higher due to different length lifters and valve stems in +2002.

Head flow numbers:
From Wicked LT1
I've got the flow numbers off an article written by GM High-Tech Performance magazine on an MTI project they were doing on heads.
The flow numbers were actually 260 @.500 and 183cfm @ .650
You can see the numbers on this chart which is half-way down the write-up here...
The heads were flowed on the MTI Super Flow bench.

http://www.motorsporttech.com/press/gmhtp_oct2005.html

From Airwolf:
Here is a run down at 0.550 & .600 lift intake for some heads including stock:
Head Man - .550 .600 intake
CNC Z06 - 304 311
AFR 205 - 292 301
AFR 225 - 307 316
Absolute - 295 286
Stock LS6 - 256 257
Stock LS1 - 223 227

The thread
http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...post1553662560

Adding increased ratio rocker arms:
http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...30&forum_id=49
http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...08&forum_id=49
pics
http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...post1551819379

Broken valve springs, stock.
http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...06&forum_id=49
http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...62&forum_id=49

Last edited by LTC Z06; 01-22-2006 at 04:21 PM.
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Old 07-14-2005, 10:33 AM   #16
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Default Maximum tire sizes.

Here is a thread about rear tire sizes.
http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...407&forum_id=1
http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...post1552324514

I Installed the Michelin 315/30/18 & 275/40/17's...
http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...25&forum_id=49

Some other threads about tires and wheels.
http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...es&forum_id=49
http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...es&forum_id=49
http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...es&forum_id=49
http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...es&forum_id=49
http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...es&forum_id=49
http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...post1551402210
http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...4&page=1&pp=20

Here's a great tool. Just enter your stock tire size, and then your proposed tire size. You'll be able to compare sidewall and overall heights in order to stay close to stock (or not, if you prefer).
http://www.miata.net/garage/tirecalc.html

Are 19s and 20s too big?
http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...post1551380627

and...
http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...22&forum_id=49
Interesting Observations - Michelin Pilot Sport vs Goodyear SC's --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Guys:

While researching new tires for my 04 Z06 (When it comes time to get new tires) , I found an interesting fact between the Michelin Pilot Sport times and the Goodyear Eagle Supercar tires.

Comparing only stock Z06 tire sizes below... (tirerack.com)

1.) Goodyear = 8/32nd tread depth, Michelin = 10/32 tread depth
Might get better tire life from Michelin...

2.) Both are rated at 220 AA A tread wear. Both should wear at the same rate.

3.) Rear Goodyear = 33lbs / Front Goodyear = 29lbs
Rear Michelin = 30lbs / Front Michelin = 26lbs
That equates to 12lbs total reduction of rotating mass on the wheels !!

4.) Rear Goodyear = $295 / Front Goodyear = $253
Rear Michelin = $354 / Front Michelin = $249

What I take from this is that the Michelin tires would last longer (assuming my driving habits stay the same )and would help to reduce rotating mass ! I might feel weight reduction. It would just cost me $102 more to buy the Michelin tires than the Goodyears.

Your thoughts ?

Is anyone running the Michelin Pilot Sports in the factory Z06 sizes ?
How do you find they compare ?

Toque

A good tire discussion with pictures
http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...6&page=1&pp=20

Last edited by LTC Z06; 01-20-2006 at 07:56 PM.
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Old 07-14-2005, 10:40 AM   #17
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Default Ram air and cold air filter systems.

A very good thread about this:
http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...air&forum_id=1

A good discussion about headers and CAI with dyno results:
http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...60&forum_id=49
and another
http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...01&forum_id=49

Quote:
Originally Posted by Milkman2
Completed a great Mod this weekend, my thanks to Dave68 for helping me with the install.. I must say it was not an easy job.. but nonetheless fun. For more info. on this install visit Dave's site at http://www.conceptualpolymer.com//co..._c5_corner.htm



Bottom view of the scoop.
Click the image to open in full size.

Front view Radiator cover cut-out.
Click the image to open in full size.

With the Warhead installed.
Click the image to open in full size.

And several hours later.
Click the image to open in full size.

Last edited by LTC Z06; 04-10-2006 at 10:48 AM.
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Old 07-14-2005, 12:37 PM   #18
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Default Gasoline and octane facts.

http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...ts&forum_id=74
by LDB
Lots of gasoline comments lately. I’m an engineer for a major oil company, familiar with engine testing for performance, economy, and emissions. I think my company’s gasoline is slightly better than other majors, but I’m not going to use the forum for advertising. Instead, I’ll make a few points about what you should look for in a gasoline. If you do that, my company will get more than an average share of your business.

Octane is generally misunderstood. High octane gasoline isn’t more powerful, it simply offers better resistance to engine knock. Lower than needed octane is a big penalty from knocking and/or spark retard, but higher than needed octane gives no benefits. Sounds odd, but it’s true as described below. Premium gasoline does have some benefits even to a car designed for regular, but those benefits aren’t from octane. They are from some other characteristics which are described at the very end, DI and additives. Let’s talk octane first.

Two main factors set octane requirement: compression ratio and spark advance. Compression ratio is a design feature of the engine, with higher ratios giving better performance, but also requiring higher octane rating. Corvettes need premium gasoline because they are high compression ratio, which requires high octane. Best performance in any given engine is at a particular spark advance, and going in either direction makes poorer performance. But while it costs performance, less than optimum spark advance does have the advantage of lowering octane requirement. So your knock sensor can compensate for low octane fuel by retarding the spark, at a cost in performance. But the reverse is not true. Once octane is high enough to allow optimum spark advance, more octane doesn’t help, because greater than optimum spark advance does not increase performance.

The Corvette gasoline spec is 91. There is some variability in engine response depending on a myriad of other characteristics including engine age, but it’s safe to say that benefits of 93 versus 91 are small, and 94 versus 93 are nil. You can make similar comments about the benefits of greater than 87 octane in a normal car. Its compression ratio is lower, so it can get to optimum spark advance on 87 octane. Running 93 octane will not help turn it into a Corvette, because it doesn’t have the compression ratio to utilize the higher octane.

Bottom line on octane is that benefit of being over manufacturers recommendation is slim to none. The only three things that can cause you to get significant benefit from going higher are: 1) a 100,000 mile engine probably needs a couple of numbers more than new due to various irregularities in an old engine, 2) if you live at high altitude, a couple of numbers over normal spec are usually needed, or 3) if you do major engine modifications to raise compression ratio.

Other issues are a detergent additive package for valve and injector cleanliness, a reliable quality control system, and good DI, drivability index, a measure of how well the fuel evaporates. All majors are roughly equivalent in those areas, and most premium gasolines have more detergent and better DI than most regulars. There are shades of gray differences in additives, but once you are with a major oil company, you need careful tests to see them. All majors (including my own) have had quality control lapses, usually with sulfur (causes odor, emissions, and gas gauge problems), particulates (plugs filters prematurely), and/or water (the worst of all, and can devastate an engine, but this one is almost unheard of with the majors). But when the rare lapse does occur, we quickly correct the problem, including any damage it may have caused. When you buy from the grocery store, or Wal-Mart, or a convenience store, you are much more exposed. Some of the time, those places buy from the majors, and their gas is perfectly OK. But all too often, they buy on the spot market, the cheapest stuff that happens to be floating by on a barge. This gives you higher probability of a serious quality control incident, and also exposes you to poor additives and DI. In the short term, you’d never notice lack of detergent additives, but over time, you engine will foul. DI symptoms are subtle, mostly a rough warm up period, but poor DI also tends to foul the engine, especially if it is short on detergent. So you have to ask yourself, do you want to fuel a $50,000 car from the lowest bidder.

Anyway, at the very end of this tome, I’d advise you to set you minimum standard as being at least recommended octane, from one of the majors. Once you are at that point, differences become small. Does 93 versus 91 or 94 versus 93 make much difference? Probably not, unless you live in the mountains or have an aging engine. Is premium worth it in your regular car for the slightly higher additive concentration and slightly better DI if you don’t need the octane? You have to make that decision. There are benefits, but you are into small stuff. It’s kind of like Mobil 1 versus normal oil. Sure, Mobil 1 is very slightly better. It’s also $4 versus $1 per quart. But that’s another long post, and I’m out of energy for now.


Quote:
Originally Posted by......
Too much octane rating when not needed, can infact decrease performance, as the burn rate of the fuel is slowed with higher octane fuel, and can act like timing retard.


Duke is a retired GM engineer.
That's a myth! Normal combustion flame propagation speed is not effected by octane. What octane does is prevent all or some portion of the unburned mixture from reacting virtually instantly, rather than being consumed by the flame front at normal flame propagation speed.

Higher octane than necessary doesn't do any good, but neither does it do any harm other than cost you more for no benefit.

Preignition and detonation are not the same phenomena, but one can lead to the other, which can rapidly damage an engine.

Duke

Last edited by LTC Z06; 08-16-2005 at 05:20 PM.
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Old 07-16-2005, 06:31 PM   #19
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Default C5 Heads Up Display Retrofit

http://joshker99.home.comcast.net/hudinstall2.htm
http://www.corvetteforum.com/techtip...=144&TopicID=1
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Old 07-16-2005, 10:52 PM   #20
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Default Install a CD Changer

http://forums.corvetteforum.com/show...00&forum_id=49
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Old 07-16-2005, 10:52 PM
 
Go Back   Corvette Forum > C5 Corvettes, 1997 - 2004 > C5 Z06 Discussion
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